Editorial

A Beginner’s Guide To Injury Reserve

Jazz rap, spaz rap, and everything in between. That’s what California (via Arizona) hip-hop trio Injury Reserve has brought to…

Jazz rap, spaz rap, and everything in between. That’s what California (via Arizona) hip-hop trio Injury Reserve has brought to the table with their two full-length LPs — and single EP. Consisting of two rappers, Nate “Ritchie With a T” Ritchie and Stepa J. Groggs, and one instrumental mastermind, Parker Corey, the group started making waves in 2015 with the release of their debut album, Live From the Dentist Office.

Riding the success of the jazzy single “Yo” and the cerebral deep cut “ttktv,” the trio came back with a vengeance at the end of 2016, dropping one of my favorite hip-hop albums of that year, Floss. Refusing to rest on their laurels, yet evidently taking the time to piece together a formidable third studio album, the trio dropped a seven-track EP, Drive It Like It’s Stolen, in the fall of 2017. With a tonal palette ranging from sexy to mean to somber, the extended play was more than enough to satisfy their growing fan base for the time being.

They have shown exactly zero signs of slowing down; they will embark on their first headline tour before the winter is over. So, if you would like to get on the Injury Reserve bandwagon before they officially blow up, here are the nine tracks you need to help you do so.

Live From the Dentist Office

“Yo”

 

With a thumping bassline, upbeat guitar, and splashy horns, this track remains one of the jazziest and most infectious instrumentals in the Injury Reserve catalogue. It is, however, somewhat deceiving; although you may want to dance, Ritchie and Stepa spit frustrated verses about their 9-5 jobs and anonymity in the genre. Further, Stepa addresses his alcoholism, a motif that appears throughout the trio’s music. Nevertheless, the two rappers come through with tones and flows that sound hungry as hell, and their determination is all too clear.

Yeah it’s good to be on/On, yeah, I’m on the clock/Cause these raps haven’t done shit but buy me a couple socks. – Ritchie

“Whatever Dude”

 

With a title that refers not only to the hook but to the relaxed vibe as well, this track is aptly named. Rapped over fluttering hi-hats, sharp snares, and breezy guitars, the lyrics address some of the same themes tackled in the previous song: struggle, the balance of work and art, the determination to blow up in the rap game. The opening verse remains one of my favorites in Ritchie’s repertoire.

I been doing some stupid shit like going to work/When I could be doing some lucrative shit like writing a verse. – Ritchie

“Ttktv”

 

Parker scales it back a bit on this track and lulls the listener with delicate, somber keys, a spellbinding drum loop, and low, growling backing vocals set behind Ritchie’s blissful singing. Then, at the three minute mark, you’re shaken by a sudden transition to an intense 25-second verse that addresses a painful relationship. It’s towards the end of the song that things getting pretty cerebral; I love the way Parker muffles and warps both the keys and Ritchie’s vocals.

Air tight bag, my heart is all in it/And I hardly fall apart but this time I’m diminished. – Ritchie

Floss

“Oh Shit!!!”

 

The biggest banger on an album jam-packed with bangers. The brilliant focal point, I think, is the contrast between the beautiful keys and the schizophrenic trap beat. Ritchie digs deep into his vocal register and throws it back to the mid-2000s with a hook that makes me want to run through eleven brick walls. The group kicks of their sophomore effort with a braggadocious flex, and the message is clear: they’re on their way up.

Remember mama told me that I need to get my act together/Ten years passed the only difference is I’m rapping better. – Stepa

“S on Ya Chest”

 

An enthralling, dream-like sonic experience, this has to be my favorite song in the IR discography. The silky smooth horns make the track an essential example of modern jazz rap and the hook is like nothing else I have ever heard; it features Ritchie on two separate tracks, rapping two different hooks that mesh together seamlessly.

Ya what you know about a young nigga like this/What you know about a young neighbor like this/I did the second one for the white kids/Cause I know you wanna say it, but that ain’t right, kid. – Ritchie

“Look Mama I Did It”

An emotional, triumphant conclusion to a phenomenal sophomore project. Here, we see Parker get on some Kanye shit; he masterfully incorporates a church choir sample into the instrumental, and I love the way he alternates the volume of the sample to match the jarring effect of the jittery hi-hats. Ritchie makes himself entirely vulnerable and spits one of the most genuine, heart-wrenching verses I have heard in my years of hip-hop fandom. Stepa picks the vibe back up with a proud meditation on the trio’s long road to success and Parker packs a sentimental wallop in the final minute of the track. He plays it out with an epic, orgasmic crescendo of the church sample, driving beat, and a science fiction synth passage.

Had the same outfit on that I graduated in/Cause I heard you were fighting the doctors and they still made you miss it. – Ritchie

Drive It Like It’s Stolen

“See You Sweat”

 

A sexy, claustrophobic banger complete with hip-swinging drums, police sirens, and a tasteful sound effect to replicate a drop of sweat. Ritchie keeps it laidback on the chorus and shows off the suave, sensual side of his hook-making chops. Although I didn’t love it at first, the whispered bridge fits the vibe of the track perfectly and sounds especially good over the hand-clapped beat.

Still feeling myself, just socializing/But you better not ask me to start freestyling. – Stepa

“Boom (x3)”

 

This instrumental is horrifying, sinister, and brilliant. If a serial killer were an instrumental, he or she would be this track. It features the same elements that make “Oh Shit!!!” great, but on steroids: lingering keys, killer bass, and cyclical drums underneath an unsettling trap beat. Ritchie sounds like he swallowed a frog full of rusted screws before he recorded this hook as he addresses the haters who chirp artists with ghostwriters. His tone and flow are relaxed, but his annoyance is clear.

And here we go back again with all the chit-chat/That he said she said, nigga just spit raps. – RitchiR

“North Pole”

 

This is the most stripped-back and vulnerable I have heard the group thus far. Rapping over a minimalist drum beat, repetitive guitar chords, and haunting vocal sample, Stepa and Ritchie address their darkest demons and spill their hearts out as plainly as any music fan can ask. Framing Ritchie’s verse as a phone call is nothing short of genius.

I love that Jay line talkin bout CBS/I been doing the same since so I can see BS. – Stepa

Make no mistake: although these dudes are successful, they are on the verge of truly exploding in the near future. If I were you, I would starting bumping their stuff sooner rather than later.

I am an economics student at The University of Massachusetts Amherst. Beyond my studies, I work as a DJ at the university radio station: 91.1 FM WMUA Amherst. Back in July, a good friend of mine launched a political debate website called The Dialectic, where I currently work as a staff writer and the Editor-In-Chief. I love all genres of music - everything from hip-hop to post-rock to hardcore punk. Aspiring writer. Avid reader. Coffee addict.
Editorial

A Beginner’s Guide to Ski Mask the Slump God

Talent is not always exciting. There are a myriad of artists in the mainstream as well as the underground with…

Talent is not always exciting. There are a myriad of artists in the mainstream as well as the underground with plenty of talent who don’t excite. Although Adele and Michael Buble can sing like nobody’s business, I am not particularly interested in either of them. That is not intended to be shade; that style of music, impressive as it is, just does not do it for me.

And then there is Ski Mask the Slump God. The 21-year-old South Florida rapper has talent coming out of his nose and he is, at the moment, one of the most exciting artists coming up in hip-hop. Known for his fast, wild flows and idiosyncratic personality, Ski started uploading his music online in 2015 and officially blew up last year with the releases of a four-track EP titled Slaps for My Drop-Top Minivan and his debut mixtape, You Will Regret.

In December, he teased fans with the tracklist and features for his next project, Beware the Book of Eli. With production by Timbaland on several tracks and guest appearances from Rich the Kid, Lil Yachty, Offset, and Busta Rhymes, it’s bound to be dope. Unfortunately, the tape has been delayed while the samples, one of which is the Boy Meets World theme song, get cleared. In the meantime, here are six Ski Mask tracks to get you up to speed.

“Rambo.”

The opening track on You Will Regret. This Phosphate beat features simple yet almost frightening keys and subtle record scratches over deep bass. In a way that reminds me of Rihanna’s “Work,” Ski’s words bleed together on a hook with a super catchy melody. The sole verse on the not-quite-two-minutes-long track is rapid, tight, funny, and precise. “No Hannah Montana, but bitch I look pretty on camera.”

 

“Bird is the Word.”

In a rare instance of a Soundcloud rapper pushing four minutes, Ski lethargically flips the bird to the police on a hook that is repetitive and mind-numbing in the best way. At the beginning of the track, his presence is announced by some sort of horn as if he is royalty. The most impressive aspect of this song, and others I will mention, is his ability to seamlessly alternate the speed of his flows. “I just want a cracker like a parrot named Polly.”

 

“BabyWipe.”

Produced by CashMoneyAP, this track is anchored by a snappy, funny hook that perfectly captures Ski’s electrifying personality. Once again, with unmatched finesse, he manages to completely switch up his flows halfway through both verses without a hint of awkwardness. On top of that, he drops some of the strongest bars on You Will Regret. “How is you feeling, vro? / Feeling like the four, bitch I feel fantastic / Which one would you be, though? / Mr. Fantastic cause the money like elastic.”

 

“Catch Me Outside.”

On his biggest hit to date, Ski raps over the Timbaland instrumental from Missy Elliot’s “She’s a Bitch” and shouts out Blue’s Clues on an undeniable pop hook. The shoutouts extend past the chorus, too; the verses are full of clever pop culture references to throwback figures including Garfield and Bow Wow’s character in Like Mike. “Put my sauce on lasagna, it could make Garfield purr.”

 

“With Vengeance” featuring Offset.

Another Timbaland joint, this is the first teaser track from Beware the Book of Eli and it brings a welcome change of pace. Ski momentarily drops the colorful, playful persona and raps with a deeply predatory tone. Offset steals the show with a chilling and energized guest verse that I wish we had seen more of on Culture II. “Snake venom vocals, flow got sicker / Sharper than sabers made straight from Darth Vader.”

 

“Wassup Wit the Bag” with Lar$$en and Jay Critch.

Although this is technically Lar$$en’s song, Ski and Jay unambiguously take over. I can say with confidence that this is the best banger you haven’t heard yet. Jamz’ beat, anchored by violins, is stupid fire. Ski goes full-blown ballistic on the hook and Jay snaps on his verse. “I just ate Mr. Krabs with some damn tartar sauce.”

 

I understand why many hip-hop fans are turned off by the Soundcloud wave. It is no secret that most of these guys have no interest in lyricism. In fact, from a technical perspective, some of them are simply not that good at rapping. However, I must emphasize that Ski Mask is different. He raps with skill, diversity, humor, and intelligence like not many others. I have yet to hear a song by him that did not have replay value. He is a rare and extremely young talent with enormous potential. Get on board as soon as you can.

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Editorial, Main

“Flower Boy” Should Have Won Best Rap Album

Allow me to begin with the obvious: I have nothing but love for K. Dot and I cannot think of…

Allow me to begin with the obvious: I have nothing but love for K. Dot and I cannot think of anyone in mainstream hip-hop who deserves more respect than he does. Overly Dedicated and Section.80 are criminally underrated projects. good kid, M.A.A.D. city is a triumphant work of conceptual art. I do not think it is out of line to declare To Pimp A Butterfly one of the top 20 albums of the last decade. Most recently, DAMN. earned Kendrick Grammy nods for, among other categories, Best Rap Album and Album of the Year. He won the former and, in a sad yet unsurprising turn of events, Bruno Mars took home the latter.

Now, to be clear, I love DAMN. I think it includes some of Kendrick’s most brilliant material to date: “DNA.,” “ELEMENT.,” “FEEL.,” “FEAR.,” “DUCKWORTH.,” and the first two and a half minutes of “XXX.” (I hit skip as soon as I hear Bono’s voice). Unfortunately, I think it also includes some of Kendrick’s weakest material to date, namely “LOYALTY.” featuring Rihanna and “LOVE.” featuring Zacari. Alternatively, the album that I think should have earned the honor of Best Rap Album, Tyler, the Creator’s Flower Boy, is just about flawless.

The hype for the Odd Future founder’s fifth full-length project began when he dropped arguably his two best singles to date: “Who Dat Boy” featuring A$AP Rocky and “911/Mr. Lonely” featuring Frank Ocean and Steve Lacy. The former is an outlandish banger anchored by a cinematic string section and Tyler’s incredible charisma. The second track rides a funky, soulful instrumental and showcases a vulnerable Tyler as he addresses the extreme loneliness with which he has struggled since achieving superstar fame. From an instrumental perspective, the third Flower Boy single, “Boredom,” is Tyler’s masterpiece. The chugging drums, melancholy keys, and blissful violins that conclude the track put Tyler’s genius on full display. The fourth and final hype track, “I Ain’t Got Time,” is a hand-clapped, throttling solo effort which reminds the listener that Tyler truly operates in his own lane.

 

As much as I love these four singles, the remainder of Flower Boy is far from filler. The opening track, “Foreword,” sets the tone for the album with some of the strongest bars Tyler has dropped in his career: “How many cars can I buy until I run out of drive? / How much drive can I have until I run out of road? / How much road can they pave until I run out of land? / How much land can it be until I run in the ocean?” With guest vocals from Kali Uchis, “See You Again” is a masterfully layered track which features gorgeous harmonies and one of the best rap flows in Tyler’s catalogue. Perhaps the most discussed song in the tracklist, “Garden Shed” is a delicate, confessional ballad on which Tyler solemnly addresses his deepest insecurities.

I could go on and on about all fourteen tracks on Flower Boy, but I think you get the point. It is a revealing and sonically diverse exploration of fame, depression, and identity that demonstrates Tyler, the Creator’s immense talents as a rapper, songwriter, and producer. It is a landmark in both a career and a life, and it is better than DAMN.

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I Am Not Here For a Joey/XXX Collab

On Saturday, January 20, 19-year-old singer and rapper XXXTENTACION posted an Instagram story in which he proposed a collaborative mixtape…

On Saturday, January 20, 19-year-old singer and rapper XXXTENTACION posted an Instagram story in which he proposed a collaborative mixtape with Brooklyn rapper and PRO ERA founder Joey Bada$$. Joey subsequently posted a screenshot of X’s story and added: “Let’s go @xxxtentacion.” There is no further indication that the project is in the works as of now.

I Am Not Here For a Joey/XXX Collab

I Am Not Here For a Joey/XXX Collab

In 2016, X was arrested on charges of domestic abuse against his pregnant girlfriend as well as accusations of witness-tampering. Although his trial was initially scheduled for May 2017, it was delayed until October. On September 8, Pitchfork published the details of the victim’s testimony against X, to which I will return later.

After another delay of the trial until December 2017, X was charged with eight more felony counts of witness-tampering based on recovered phone messages. After spending several days in jail without bail, he was released for two months of house arrest. He will appear in court again on Wednesday, January 24.

I have never had a more difficult time reading an article than I did when I first read the details of the victim’s testimony. The abuse X inflicted upon this woman was evil, disgusting, and, at some points, downright terrifying. Her story depicts a life of constant fear that this hostile and violent man may snap at any moment for no apparent reason. He is a despicable monster who deserves a life sentence in prison, and I cannot fathom why anybody would continue to support his career. If you are a fan of XXXTENTACION, I implore you to read the Pitchfork article and re-evaluate whether or not you want to put money in this man’s wallet.

To say that I am disappointed in Joey is an understatement. Having followed his mixtapes and singles in the build-up to his full-length debut, B4DA$$, I am confident that he is one of the first hip-hop artists I genuinely loved. His follow-up project, All-AmeriKKKan Badass, one of the best hip-hop albums of 2017, solidified Joey as one of the premiere conscious rappers in the mainstream at the remarkably young age of 22 years old.

To see him grow from the fun-loving kid rapping with his friends on “School High” to the mature man lamenting the evils of institutional racism on “TEMPTATION” has been one of the most gratifying experiences of my musical fandom. Pride is not an emotion I frequently feel when I listen to music. When I first spun “LAND OF THE FREE” last year, I felt proud of Joey Bada$$.

Will morbid curiosity get the best of me and compel me to listen to this collaboration? Yes. Will I continue to be a Joey fan if he goes through with this collaboration? Yes. Will I lose some respect for an artist I have admired since high school? Yes.

Please, Joey. Listen to your fans. Do not collaborate with this terrible human being. You’re better than that.

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Teka$hi 6ix9ine is Proving To Be 2018’s most unusual rapper

Controversial rapper Teka$hi 6ix9ine, real name Daniel Hernandez, is one of 2018’s most idiosyncratic underdogs. The Brooklyn native began his…

Controversial rapper Teka$hi 6ix9ine, real name Daniel Hernandez, is one of 2018’s most idiosyncratic underdogs. The Brooklyn native began his career as a Soundcloud artist and gained national attention after his rainbow-colored hair, bright gummy grills, and stylized “69” tattoos across his body painted him as the “final boss” of Soundcloud Rappers in an internet meme.

Teka$hi 6ix9ine is Proving To Be 2018’s most unusual rapper

While his striking image spread online,6ix9ine’s song “Gummo” began amassing millions of views on YouTube after its October release, eventually reaching #12 on the Billboard Hot 100. The song sports aggressive lyrics over a trappy Pierre Bourne instrumental, with the “Scum Gang” rapper screaming: “She wanna fuck but keep her clothes on, I only want the jaw, man that’s all I really use her for, as I kick her out the door.”

In December, Teka$hi plead guilty for the use of a child in a sexual performance. According to court documents and XXL, the charges stem from an incident that occurred at a friends apartment in Harlem on February 21, 2015. Detective Maureen Sheehan stated the victim, who was 13 years old at the time, was seen in a series of videos “completely nude sitting on the lap of the defendant [Hernandez]…[with] his arms around the child.”

In an interview with DJ Akademiks, Teka$hi at first denied the allegations.

“When she came in she asked me how old I was, and I told her I was 18, and I assumed she was older. The way she was asking made me think she was older.”

Teka$hi also denounced his actions based on his age, saying he was “a kid,” and “17 years young,” when according to court documents his birthday is in 1996 — making him 18 during the time of the assault. “I’m not touching the girl,” the rapper went on to say to Akademiks, “I’m not having sexual intercourse with the girl, I’m not doing nothing.”

6ix9ine plead guilty to the charges in November and will be sentenced on January 30, 2018. The artist has been ordered not to post sexually explicit or violent images featuring women/children to social media. He also must obtain his GED, not commit another crime for two years and “write a letter to his victim and her family detailing why his participation in the videos was harmful to her and her family.”

Teka$hi will receive three years probation if he meets these qualifications, and won’t have to register as a sex offender. The rapper faces one to three years in prison if any of these conditions aren’t met.

 

With Teka$hi’s Hyper-Violent Shock Rap coming into mainstream playing alongside other controversial acts like XXXTENTACION, it will be a defining next few months for the Hip-Hop industry. Will labels support those with disturbing pasts like Teka$hi 6ix9ine, and if so, will listeners be able to stomach any tracks the artists release from here on out?

Fellow Soundcloud artists Trippie Redd and Ski Mask The Slump God have already distanced themselves from X and Teka$hi. Redd said via Instagram “I’m sorry brozay, 1400 don’t support pedophiles,” and Ski Mask said X is “crazy as hell.”

In the meantime, Teka$hi shows no signs of slowing down. The rapper recently released his “Keke” music video featuring Fetty Wap and A Boogie With A Hoodie, and is gearing up to release his debut Kooda tape very soon.

https://instagram.com/p/Bdo3JPsHNyV/

In addition to the criminal charges, 6ix9ine has also gotten a bashing via Twitter this month after a video posted by Ugly God revealed his chains were fake. Producer Pierre Bourne also came out and dismissed his track “Gummo,” saying the instrumental was meant for Trippie Redd, and not for 6ix9ine. With the hate flowing in, Teka$hi’s seems to hold his head high.

“I run New York, I’m in fucking charge right now, whatever I say goes,” he told DJ Akademiks recently. Fans, while skeptical, will soon see if his words hold merit.

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