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Matt Citron: The Buzz Is Infectious

“I remember going to the studio with Big Boi, and going there, and meeting him. I was playing some of…

“I remember going to the studio with Big Boi, and going there, and meeting him. I was playing some of my music over the AUX and saw him in the back of the room with his eyes closed swaying in the back.” –Matt Citron

[dropcap]A[/dropcap]s a city, Atlanta has a certain lane that it has come to inhabit in hip-hop’s eco-system; rightfully so, superstars like Gucci and Future, as well as coverage like that on Noisey’s Atlanta series, it would be easy to [some degree] pigeon hole their sound. That’s part of the reason that an election-day email telling men to check out the next biggest thing from the city was met with a little cynicism. That it, until I pressed play. The artist in question, Matt Citron, has a certain energy about him. His latest single, “404” featuring the Yeezy affiliated XXL freshman alumni Cyhi The Prince–and Money Makin’ Nique–is getting some crazy traction, but his Facebook reveals some of the madness that will likely come to pass. One example is him spending a week working with Buckwild of the mighty D.I.T.C—or him getting love from artists like Busta And Outkast’s Big Boi.

In general, artists who have this much buzz, they pan out to special—especially when respected taste-makers are giving their seals of approval. I won’t make unduly comparisons to past examples, but as a writer it’s exciting to catch up with the rapper in the ‘calm’ before the storm. Check out the interview with Matt below, and see what you’ve been sleeping on!

Early!

One thing that stuck out is, you had a quote from DJ Greg Street that says you could be one of Atlanta’s next top artists. How does a co-sign like that feel?

I think I met Greg going a little under two years ago now, and when we got introduced to each other, he supported me from the jump. Greg’s kind of notoriously known in Atlanta for not wanting to get involved with a lot of rappers early on. Obviously with what he does, he deals with rappers every single day, and deals with different artists every single day, but when he met me, he just took to the music right away. He took to the energy of what I was doing, and the reasons I was doing it. I’ve been around him a lot where he’s talked about how much he believes in what I’m doing, and basically, really just believes in my ability, and my vision.Greg Street, growing up, that was someone that I looked up to, and I admired. I’ve been having a lot of things happen lately that feel like–over the past couple years really-dreams almost? Not even like dreams, but they don’t set in. It’s crazy, you know?

Having someone that big giving that high praise, I always think with the amount of work I put in, and how blessed I’ve been to be able to do what I can do, I feel as though, do I deserve those words? Yeah, I feel I do, just because of the amount of time I spend on it. But, that doesn’t take away from the fact that it’s mind blowing to have someone at that level, and that stature, to say that. I obviously have the belief in myself that I can take this as far as I set my mind to, but to have someone at that level confirm it, it’s amazing, and it does feel incredible.

How are you different than a lot of Atlanta artists? Because also, from Greg Street saying you’re one of the biggest artists in Atlanta, that’s huge because there’s such a range of artists that have come out of Atlanta, you know what I mean? And the music from Atlanta has grown so much – I don’t want to say the genre has expanded there, but it has a lot of sub genres.

Well, honestly, I think maybe what makes me stand out in Atlanta is the reason that Atlanta stands out, period. I think that’s probably because there are so many different types of artists in Atlanta that aren’t afraid to stand out. I think that we kind of break the mold in different ways. You have different artists, even going back all the way to Outkast who broke the mold–Atlanta, back then, it wasn’t even rap. Like the booty shake music was big back then, and then Outkast came through with some real lyrics, and they cracked that open. They were doing this vibey, chilled out, super lyrical rapping, and they showed that Atlanta could break the mold. And then time and time again, I think Future invented that style of just the real gutter, muddy singing, and then you have artists like Lil’ Yachty who no one’s never heard anybody sing like that before, and then people just take influence from Atlanta. But I think really, Atlanta’s just not afraid to break the mold. If I’ve taken anything from the culture, just from observing it in Atlanta –not even really saying like ‘taken,’ but just really learned from what I’ve seen – it’s that you can do your own thing here.

I think really, that’s the artists that make it. I think that the artists that try to copy other artists in Atlanta, they don’t cut through in a real way that’s going to have any longevity. For me, I just grew up listening to so many different types of music, so many different types of hip hop artists in particular, and so my influences were so broad that I took a lot from that. And also, I have a very large influence from the New York rappers as well, because I spent a couple of years up there, but really, my whole family’s from up in New York, so I grew up listening to a lot of the artists like that. But yeah, I think what separates me from a lot of the artists in Atlanta, I think it would be too hard for me to do that. It’s like, what separates Migos from Lil’ Yachty? What separates Young Jeezy from T.I? There’s so much there. And so I think that really, probably what separates me is the same thing that makes me alike. I am different, and I sound different, and I think there’s a lot of artists coming out of the city that just don’t sound really like anybody else around.


Matt Citron: The Buzz Is Infectious
Matt with (clockwise) Buckwild, Greg Street, & Diamond D.

Over the last few years, things have been picking up for you. What have been some of the milestones?

Well, I dropped out of school. After I was playing college ball, I hurt my eye and I just didn’t want to be up in New York anymore, [so I] decided to come down to Atlanta–back to where I was born and raised. I spent a lot of time by myself, just working. I looked up to Greg Street, and me and him had a close relationship, we spent a lot of time just talking, and doing different things, recording different stuff, and I just spent a lot of time doing some self reflecting. I think I really got to know myself for that first year, and then after that, finally I dropped the song. It was originally called “Exhibit C,” which is now call “Tabasco Flows.” I put that out, which is basically just me rapping over Jay Electronica’s “Exhibit C” beat, and I remember the first night I put it out, DJ Khaled retweeted it, and that was crazy. After that, I took a little bit of time off, and I actually got linked up with Brooklyn Nights; I’m working with them now, and they introduced me to a bunch of guys. I went up to New York, and I was in the studio with Busta Rhymes, and Jim Jones. That was crazy, because those are two of my biggest influences I’ve ever listened to.

So, I was in the studio with them, and the fact that they listened to my music, but they didn’t just listen to it, like they really fucked with it…I think each artist kind of has their own growth, and it’s all individual. I think just the way that it’s been happening for me. I’ve met Sway, I did Sway in the Morning when he was down here in Atlanta for BET, and he really fucked with me. So I just felt like there are people in the industry that are so well respected, and the way I’m coming up with things, it doesn’t feel like a lot of other artists have been this blessed this early on with what they’re doing, but it doesn’t feel forced, it doesn’t feel contrived. These people don’t fuck with me because it’s like ‘Oh, this kid’s going to make us some money.’ Nah, it’s been ‘We respect what you’re doing, we love how you’re making music.’ It’s hip hop, it’s real, it’s raw, it’s what I’m doing, and so they’ve taken to it. Moments like that, like when I was in the studio with Busta Rhymes, we actually went out after that, and just being out, just off the sheer strength that he just fucked with my music. Things like that. Then putting out songs and having it get played on Beats One with Ebro. It’s just little things.

It’s just little things, and none of them, the Busta Rhymes and Jim Jones shit was fucking unreal, but none of them hits you crazy hard, especially with me, I’m the type of person I just like to keep my head down and keep pushing. But with that, it’s just these little things where I sit back for a second and be like, holy fucking shit; these are the people that I’ve looked up to for years, and that I’ve only seen on TV, and in videos, and over the tracks. I remember going to the studio with Big Boi, and going there, and meeting him. I was playing some of my music over the AUX and saw him in the back of the room with his eyes closed swaying in the back; it’s just little moments like that where you feel so blessed, and you also just feel proud of yourself that you worked hard. A lot of these songs, you work on them alone in your room, or just in the studio, just you and your engineer, and then you just don’t even realize the places they can take you, or the people they can put you in front of. It’s definitely been some very unbelievable moments, but it’s also just been a positive past year/year and a half of people just really showing me love, and supporting, and being involved with what I’m doing.

So what’s next then? You mentioned you’re in the studio with Jim, you’re in the studio with Busta, you’re in the studio with Big Boy, so is there like a super monster project we should be looking out for?

Yeah, I mean really that was kind of vibing out, and then listening to what I was doing. I remember sitting down with Busta and him telling me ‘We’re gonna get on a track together, we’re gonna do it,’ and I remember what he said, he was like ‘I’m gonna murder you on it.’ Then he kind of laughed and looked around, then got quiet, got in close and said, ‘I’m really just saying that because I want you to murder me on the track.’ So just to feel the level of competition there – but right now, I think everyone’s just enjoying watching what’s going on, and I don’t even feel like I’m at the place where I want to – I mean obviously, I want to make music with guys like that, but I feel like I’m in the position where I need to prove myself more than that at this point. Right now, I’m making music, I’ve got a tape coming in December that I’m going to be putting out, it’s called Final Moments of Forever, and really on this tape, I just want it to be an introduction to what I’m doing. It does deal with a lot of personal things in my life, and there’s also just a lot to prove. I feel like I have a lot that I have to show out.

If I’m going to be regarding myself as one of the best lyricists, if not the best lyricist in my opinion, then I can’t come out of the gate with anything but really fucking crazy shit. If I’m going to have other people supporting me, and hitting me up, and sending me messages saying ‘You’re like the dopest rapper I’ve found in a long time,’ I’ve got to step up to the plate, and I’ve got to hit home runs. So I feel like right now, it’s just a point of stepping up to the plate and proving myself, and I’m still working on music nonstop. I’m just making it clear that I’m not interested in just being another guy in the mix. I’m here to compete. I grew up playing basketball, and I’ve always played that at a very high competitive level, obviously playing in college, and I don’t like buddy-buddy stuff.

I love the positive vibes, and meeting other artists, and vibing out with them, but it’s kind of like when I used to play ball. If we were boys, we played on the same travel team–we might even go out, get some food together, play some video games together, whatever. But when it comes time to play against each other, you’re ripping heads off, and you’re trying to come at that guy’s neck, and you’re trying to win that game. When the game’s over, you laugh about it, and you shake hands, and you talk shit if you want, and you take the shit if you lost. But right now I’m kind of in the mindset where I want to come in and make some noise, and I think there’s no better way to do that than put my head down and try to do the best work I possibly can. So regarding what’s next, this project coming up, I probably got one more track coming out before then that’s going to be on the tape, but other than that, the tape’s coming, and then I got a whole mess of shit coming after that. I’ve got a lot of shit in the chamber that I’m working on. I don’t really see any point or sign of slowing with what I’ve got going. I’m hungrier than I’ve ever been, and I wake up each day, and the hunger keeps growing, so I’m feeling it right now.

Riley here — father, artist, videographer, professional writer and SERIOUS hip-hop head. I'm a member of the Universal Zulu Nation, and I think everything is better on vinyl. Add me on Twitter! @specialdesigns
interview

JUNE POPI TALKS GEORGE FLOYD, COVID-19 & CHASING THE DREAM

Unlike most artists, OKC rapper June Popi isn’t allowing the current pandemic to stop his progression. A street-smart new sensation…

Unlike most artists, OKC rapper June Popi isn’t allowing the current pandemic to stop his progression. A street-smart new sensation considers capitalizing on the current climate to achieve superstardom for his unknown region, an act that puts him on a collision course with the top of the charts. On his way to the top, we talk to June about his loyal fanbase, turning dreams into reality and how the current social issues affect him personally. Ahead of his promising debut, learn everything about June Popi here.

What is the most important thing for you to accomplish within your career?
Be able to say I chased a dream and caught it.

What do you want to say to your fans?
I got some of the most solid fans on God. I fuck with them personally

How do you feel about the current events taking place in the world right now?
No justice. No peace. RIP George Floyd

As an artist, what is the first thing you plan to do once this pandemic lifts?
I’m outside with it. I’m going wherever I need to be.

How have you been utilizing this time as an artist?
I have been working on an album.

Can we expect any new content (Videos) from you soon?
Hell yeah, “Calvin Klein” finna drop real soon. Subscribe to my Youtube channel.

Where can fans reach you?
Twitter and Instagram are @JunePopi.

Any last remarks?
Stay down and go get some money.

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interview

Yella Beezy Talks “Keep It In The Streets,” Dallas, Nipsey Hussle & Errol Spence Jr In New Interview

The Dallas-native has singlehandedly chronicled a resume that will be studied and attempted to be emulated for generations to come….

The Dallas-native has singlehandedly chronicled a resume that will be studied and attempted to be emulated for generations to come. Platinum singles, a-list collaborations, critically-acclaimed mixtapes, stamps from legends like Chris Brown, L.A. Reid and the late-Nipsey Hussle and all of this before even releasing a debut album. Today, the “That’s On Me” hitmaker talks about his journey to the top with correspondent Boom in a new interview for 50 Cent outlet, Thisis50.

During the interview, Yella Beezy talks Dallas’s current musical landscape, provides details on the new album, bad contracts, business outside of music, Drake, Nipsey Hussle, Errol Spence Jr, L.A. Reid and more. Baccen Beezy is currently promoting his new single, “Keep It In The Streets” as he readies a new single with Young Thug, titled, “Headloc,” scheduled for release this month.

Watch the complete interview here and stream Yella Beezy’s “Keep It In The Streets” now, available via Hitco.

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interview

Meet Kris Jewelers: Blueface, Rae Sremmurd Jeweler

In today’s Hip Hop, jewelry is as essential as the raps. Artists have to always shine bright and what better…

In today’s Hip Hop, jewelry is as essential as the raps. Artists have to always shine bright and what better way to do that than with a never-before-seen piece of jewelry that catches everyone’s attention. This is where Mississippi jeweler, Kris Jewelers comes in. Kris is one of the hottest new jewelers in today’s Hip Hop who has become a most-sought-after industry go-to in 2019.

Unique, signature style, reliable and one-of-kind, many of today’s biggest recording artists seek out this Mississippi-native for his originality and authenticity. Its trust that Kris has earned from many of today’s biggest stars whose pieces have received rave reviews and drawn more and more artists to his southern design.

Through word-of-mouth, Kris Jewelers has accumulated a who’s who clientele which includes music’s biggest names like Jeremih, Blueface, Swae Lee, Birdman and many more. Not just music, Kris has created several priceless pieces for professional athletes in both NFL and NBA.

Meet Kris Jewelers: Blueface, Rae Sremmurd Jeweler

Meet Kris Jewelers: Blueface, Rae Sremmurd Jeweler

Meet Kris Jewelers: Blueface, Rae Sremmurd Jeweler

Kris Jewelers’ collection is available now at his Northpark Mall store in Ridgeland, Mississippi. You may also purchase custom design jewelry today online at the official Kris Jewelers website.

Follow Kris Jeweler on Instagram for daily updates on new collections and clients.

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interview

Texas’ Lil X Is Ready To Takeover As The ‘New Kid on the Block’

The rapper Lil X, born in El Paso, Texas, is crafting an undeniable path to the top right now. Young,…

The rapper Lil X, born in El Paso, Texas, is crafting an undeniable path to the top right now. Young, rowdy, and popular, he is achieving viral attention with his new project, New Kid on the Block, and the project’s breakout hits, “Galaxy” and “Bands All Done”. On the verge of becoming a social firestorm, we sit down with the star on the rise to get familiar with who he is, where he’s from, what he’s about and what he has in store.

[AAHH]: What was it like growing up where you are from?

[Lil X]: It was fine, I got to do what I wanted. El Paso is right on the border of Mexico so there is lots of tradition and mixed culture.

Has your family been supportive of your career?

Yes my family has been supportive and I know they are trying to understand what I’m doing and one day fully learns what I’m creating and what I’m making.

If you had to choose one record for someone to listen to from you, what would it be?

Greatness, its uplifting and gives off a different feel. I personally say most people would enjoy this song.

Was “New Kid on the Block” your debut project or can new fans find more of your catalog elsewhere?

It was mostly my debut project but im going to be releasing more music soon.

Can you describe the creative process behind “New Kid on the Block”?

Well I sat down in my room and I played the beat and found were the words would fit and then created the correct melody and bam I took out each song one by one.

What are the singles from your latest project?

Galaxy, Pouri’n, and Bands All Done.

Any notable producers you are working with or want to work with?

I think Reazy Renegade is a great producer I work with. I would like to work with Molly Raw and Muder Beats in the future.

Any big-name features in the vault that we could expect anytime soon?

I have a couple of people that I’m talking with but I don’t want to give them up yet.

You’re only 16 so we wanted to ask you a random question. Can you name 5 Lil Wayne records? If so what are your favorite 5?

Yes I’m going to go with How to love, A Milli, Mona Lisa, 6 Foot 7 Foot, and Lollipop.

If you could choose 3 people to be on your next project who would it be?

I would probably go with Tavis Scott, Lil Skies, and Lil Uzi Vert.

Any label attention or calls right now?

I have a lot of different things happening and I’m looking for my best options before I sign to anything.

For more on Lil X, follow the rising star on Instagram.

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