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Sonny Digital Drops Off Two New Tracks: “Keep It Real” and “Love My Plug”

Sonny drops “Keep It Real” and “Love My Plug” featuring recurrent collaborator Black Boe.

Sonny Digital knows how to make a club banger. While the Atlanta hitmaker is chiefly known for his beats, Sonny is racking up on singles as an MC. It is evident to say he can spit after showing us on his collab project with Black Boe in 2017 titled The Black Goat. Sonny’s first EP, Woke You Up was slated to drop over the weekend, on Jan.26, but with that not happening Sonny decided to give us new music to keep our playlists buzzing. Sonny drops “Keep It Real” and “Love My Plug” featuring recurrent collaborator Black Boe.

Produced by Honorable C.N.O.T.E., “Keep It Real” is driven with melody while maintaining trap energy. “Strippers in the club and they dancin’ every night/Lord forgive her cause you know they ain’t living right/Lord forgive me because I’ma be in there tonight,” he raps.

“Love My Plug” is a production by Sonny Digital and B Wheezy. On the upbeat track, Sonny and Black Boe express the love they have for their drug dealer. It is not a complete surprise Sonny produces some of his records, as he always been forthright about producers being mistreated in the music industry. He believes — and is vocal about — producers are not being appropriately compensated for the essential contributions they deserve.

“You take the beats off of them vocals, and you know it’ll sound like shit,” said the “Birthday Song” producer said in a video via Twitter. “Y’all need to start respecting the producers a little more, big or small.”

Sonny Digital Drops Off Two New Tracks: "Keep It Real" and "Love My Plug"

Listen to Sonny Digital’s new tracks “Keep It Real” and “Love My Plug” below.

I love everything about hip-hop music and the culture. Creator/Producer/Host for #StayOnTV. 'Purple Haze' and 'Illmatic' are my favorite albums and I love Lemon Pepper wings. Follow me! Instagram - @ashleytiffaney | Twitter - ashleytiffaney
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#IndieSpotlight: RetroPOP Provides A Worthwhile Slice Of Personal Nostalgia

A lot of curious indie projects have landed across my desk this year, but this week one of most unique…

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#IndieSpotlight: Dough the Freshkids’ ‘Black Rome’ Is A Buzzworthy Slice Of Hip Hop Goodness

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This is what I found so intriguing about the new project Black Rome by Dough the Freshkid — representing Crenshaw, California. The follow up to his free tape Six Shots and released via his independent label Every Penny Count, the 15-song effort is a blend of vibes, ranging from an early millennium G-Unit mixtape structure (see the chorus on “Cookin’”), 90s east coast soundscapes (see “We Rich” with its scratch hook), to deeply reflective contextual content aimed at giving opposing viewpoints to widely accepted “fact.”

 
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Elsewhere on the record, he traverses themes such as the (historical) political and social-economic climate in the United States (see “God’s Curse” verse two) to gang life in LA. Nothing is ever glorified, and everything comes off as methodically thoughtful. On the track “I See He Blued Up,” he addresses industry Crippin,’ as well as unnecessary killing in the streets. “Man up, out the choppas down and out your hands up,” he raps, pointing to the glorification of needless gun violence.

 
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“I never promote crack in my raps, I only promote facts in my raps,” he implores as the project comes to a close with the dramatically honest, autobiographical “Sincerely Me.” Even at its most informative and reflective, Dough manages to make this project an incredibly digestible gem packed with lots of wisdom and great talking points. Worth a spot on your end of year playlist if you’re looking for some undeniable fire that is still creeping under the radar.

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