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Director Myster DL Chats About His New Cypress Hill Documentary

Myster DL, rapper and trusted video director who has an excellent portfolio of over 250 videos with acts like Redman,…

Myster DL, rapper and trusted video director who has an excellent portfolio of over 250 videos with acts like Redman, Sean Price, Styles P, Chuck D, Cormega, and more, recently dropped a new documentary about Cypress Hill, a group he fondly credits for helping him to make Hip Hop himself.

The Haunted Hill Documentary was filmed in one night in Boston, Massachusetts, at the legendary House of Blues. “I worked on the edit for a few days and sent a few drafts over to the guys and management,” DL tells AAHH. “They do a three-day tour annually—and I usually catch a couple of those shows.”

“Earlier this year I had released a video for Cypress Hill’s Eric Bobo, and we are always planning our next project,” he continues. “We are in the process of possibly doing a few music videos for the band.”

As DL explains, he’s been aquatinted with the iconic group for over a decade. “I’ve known B-Real the longest; I met him in roughly 2004 while living—and DJing—in Miami. I made an edited version of his Gunslinger Mixtape and sent it to him via AOL instant messenger. He was grateful and said if I ever needed anything to contact him.”

At first, DL didn’t take the open invitation seriously. “I just thought this was something people say and took a chance and asked him for a verse,” he recalls. “Within two hours I had an email and acappella. I put the verse on my iPod Nano and walked around listening to it for three weeks. We did a song together in 2004, and that blossomed into a cool relationship with the whole crew.”

“I have a song with B Real, Sticky Fingaz, Rockness Monsta and Kool G Rap that will premier on the soundtrack of my next film,” DL says proudly. “Cypress Hill inspired me to make music which eventually turned into a successful film career, so its a trip to even know them.”

According to DL, this is his most significant project to date. “It’s my first documentary film; however I do have a series of short documentaries called “Rewind The Scenes” where I look back at the making of some of my biggest music videos,” he explains.

The Haunted Hill Documentary is a must-watch for any Cypress fan; check it out below.

Riley here — father, artist, videographer, professional writer and SERIOUS hip-hop head. I'm a member of the Universal Zulu Nation, and I think everything is better on vinyl. Add me on Twitter! @specialdesigns
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Pressure Dommer Teases His New EP With ”Dopeman” Single/Video

The big record is a brilliant look into the crystal ball of what to expect going forward.

Orlando, Florida, rapper Pressure Dommer is currently in the studio putting the finishing touches on his upcoming EP, 8. Set to be his biggest release to date since signing on with No Convo Entertainment — headed by acclaimed record producer Fye Jones — and to wet our appetites, has dropped off a new single and video, Dopeman.

Directed by Brill Adium, the shadowy visual is a cinematic experience, with Pressure on the late night grind; the at times frantic camera motion plays up the almost paranoia-ridden state of being experienced by a trafficker in the trap amid a sea of potential downfalls. The big record is a brilliant look into the crystal ball of what to expect going forward.

“I would describe my sound as reality music,” he tells AAHH, “very influential and soulful … full of jewels.” As he describes it, his grandad and grandma influenced him the most; “seeing them work hard to provide for multiple people — and do it from the bare minimum — [pushes me to strive for the best].

He also tells us that signing with No Convo rests among his most significant achievements. “It’s an opportunity for me to do what I love and be supported by a company that believes in me,” he says.

With his eye on the prize, and the goal of creating a lasting legacy in the music industry, Pressure is one of the hungriest rappers we’ve come across in a minute. “We’re getting this project ready for the masses,” he confidently, pointing toward the near future. It’s about to be a hot summer!

Check out the visual, below. 

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Cold War: An Interview With Rising Upstart Cautious Clay

We spoke to Cautious about his musical influences, creative process, and a fated trip to Korea that changed his life.

Cautious Clay burst onto the scene last September with the release of his debut single, “Cold War,” and hasn’t looked back since. The former leasing agent marketer has progressed at a torrid pace since the impressive drop, accomplishing more in nine months than most artists do in an entire career: he’s racked up millions of plays on Spotify alone, performs throughout the country, and is already being hounded by major labels. He re-released his debut EP, Blood Type, attached with an extra track, “Stolen Moments,” in April and is already slated to release a new EP by the end of May. We spoke to Cautious about his musical influences, creative process, and a fated trip to Korea that changed his life. You can check it all out, below.

Not even a year ago, you were working as a leasing agent marketer. What was it like working a 9-5 as a passionate musician?

I was fortunate enough to find a way to make a living out of college. But, besides that, it was still something that I realized, even though I was making money, it wasn’t in a way in which I was happy. As cheesy as it sounds, I’m kind of a guy of my convictions and I didn’t relate to anyone else at my job. It was super soul-sucking.

And what made you finally take the leap of faith and quit?

Long story short, I had been making beats and stuff for several years and had a lot of weird ass beats up on my Soundcloud. The head of a Korean label sent me an email almost three years ago, in 2015, saying he wanted me to come out to Korea to work. At first I said, “That’s ridiculous,” and I ignored it. A year later, my manager was going out to Korea for a vacation and asked a friend of his if there was anyone he should meet while out there. He was introduced to the same guy that cold-emailed me years ago and they were like, “We have to get him to Korea.”

I was still working in corporate throughout those years and basically had no vacation time, I had like one or two days, and I took unpaid days off too and was like cool, I wanna do this. I basically ended up producing eight songs for these semi-big Korean artists; that was super surreal for me. The fact that I did that, I was like okay this is a sign. The beats were just some stuff I was working on like on a plane ride or making randomly, so I realized if I really just put 100% of my efforts into this and focused, maybe I could make a career out of this. One of the songs I produced ended up being nominated for a Korean Hip-Hop Award.

Growing up in Cleveland, how did the city influence you musically, i.e., Kid Cudi or Bone Thugs-N-Harmony? Sometimes your voice sounds eerily similar to Kid Cudi’s, although you’re different stylistically.

It’s funny you say Bone Thugs because they lived in Mayfield Heights, not too far from me. I think in terms of inspirations growing up, I would say that Cudi was surprisingly not a huge influence, I had always heard about his stuff and kinda listened to it peripherally but I never really got into it, funny enough. Not that I don’t like him as an artist, but he was never super inspiring for me.

You said in a past interview that you’re heavily influenced by Hip-Hop. Which artists in particular?

Today, there’s some artists I really like even just because of a couple verses that they’ve done. I really love Earl Sweatshirt’s verse on, “Super Rich Kids.” I think he’s incredibly talented and I really fuck with his stuff. Obviously Andre 3000 is amazing. Sometimes stylistically I’m really into Ugly God too, he’s of a genre that I love because it’s the most self-deprecating, he’s just funny.

And which artists overall?

I was super into a lot of different stuff, a lot of stuff my parents turned me onto early on, I kinda didn’t accept at first as most kids wouldn’t, but it kinda comes back around. I listened to a lot of RnB, Pop Punk; Green Day, Lil Bow Wow, 50 Cent, a bunch of pop of just in the early 2000’s and late 90’s was around the house and in my ears. In my teens I was a really big jazz head and played in a jazz band.

Which artists would you most like to collaborate with?

I’m really stoked actually to collaborate, I think I might be working with Duckwrth pretty soon, I really like his stuff. I would definitely say Kendrick Lamar, he’s so sick, that’d definitely be the dream collab. Otherwise I’m kinda open to different ideas in terms of collaborations. Someone like Alina Baraz might be cool or SZA. Maybe even in a production sense it could be interesting.

 
As a poly-instrumentalist, front man and songwriter, what’s the creative process like for you in terms of collaboration? Do you do most everything alone or like to include others in the process?

That’s a great question, I’m kind of grappling with that right now because I do get hit up for a lot of production and collabs, and it’s easiest sometimes for me to just be by myself and just make everything on my own. But there are some situations where I’ve been collaborating with people lately, on my next project I have one co-production, everything else is on my own. That’s a good example of someone having a cool sound, something I admire, and I’ll work with them for that particular reason. But in general I definitely feel like it’s difficult because I am a producer, so if a producer wants to work with me you gotta be good, cause I can already do this.

Blood Type seems to cover lots of topics regarding relationships, specifically, people struggling to stay present in the digital age. Would you say the whole E.P. is based on this theme or is the project more so general observation?

I would say it’s more of a general observation and that’s just a part of it. I try to toe the line and not be preachy in how people lead their lives, I like to have more of a reflective mentality about it. Everyone has a different perspective on things and I wanted to show my interpretation of how I see things. That stems back to the title, Blood Type, representing my identity in a grander sense. It’s purposefully trying to highlight my perspective on relationships and on things people might wanna consider or think more about in their own lives. I’m not trying to say you’re bad for using Tinder, of course, use Tinder! But kind of like hey, this is where we’re at and this is okay but also just realize that you can live your life in a lot of different ways.

From a songwriting perspective, are all of your songs based on your personal experiences or do you draw inspiration from elsewhere?

Mostly, 80-90%, my experiences because for me, that’s the easiest way to feel that what I’m saying is authentic. It’s weird for me me to try to do something if it doesn’t feel right. I think today is the coolest time to just be yourself, so, that’s all I can do.

Stay independent or sign?

I think I’m definitely gonna stay independent for the near future, but down the line, if an opportunity comes about that makes sense for me, I would definitely consider that.

What’s on the horizon for Cautious Clay?

Yeah, right now I’m actually working on putting out my next project at the end of May. It’s something I’m pretty stoked about, it’s a 3-4 song E.P. There’s gonna be a video and some pretty cool artwork that my friend Lane is working on, he did all of the artwork for the last project. I’m playing a show at Bowery on July 24th. I’m just stoked to keep it moving, it’s a fun one for sure.

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Tee Grizzley’s Highly-Anticipated Debut, ‘Activated’ Has Arrived

After months of anticipation, Detroit’s breakout star Tee Grizzley has released his much-hyped debut album, properly-titled, Activated. Since coming on…

After months of anticipation, Detroit’s breakout star Tee Grizzley has released his much-hyped debut album, properly-titled, Activated.

Since coming on the scene in 2017, he’s been building up to this moment with songs like the platinum hit single, “First Day Out” and critically acclaimed debut mixtape, My Moment. Tee Grizzley tells his story of trials, tribulations, and triumph growing up in the Motor City. The 24-year-old seizes his moment with his signature street mentality and aggressive attitude.

Activated features all-star cast of guest appearances including Jeezy, Chris Brown, Lil Pump, Lil Yachty, YFN Lucci, and many more. Tee Grizzley’s debut album features 18 brand new songs, including hit singles, “2 Vaults”, “Jettski Grizzley”, and “Colors”. Activated is available everywhere exclusively through 300 Entertainment.

Courtesy of Spotify, Stream Tee Grizzley’s debut album, Activated below.

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Playboi Carti’s “Die Lit” Has Arrived

ASAP Rocky-protege Playboi Carti had a huge 2017 thanks to his debut single, “Magnolia” and self-titled debut album. Continuing the…

ASAP Rocky-protege Playboi Carti had a huge 2017 thanks to his debut single, “Magnolia” and self-titled debut album. Continuing the trend, Playboi Carti surprises fans with a brand new sophomore album intriguingly titled, Die Lit.

Known for his influential swagger and bass-driven sound, the Atlanta-native returns with 19 all-new tracks. Reflecting on his skyrocketing success (both good and bad), and reuniting with go-to hit-making producer Pi’erre Bourne (“Magnoila”), Carti collaborates with a lot of heavy hitters this time around, like Nicki Mianj, Travis Scott, Lil Uzi Vert, Young Thug, Skepta, Bryson Tiller, and many more.

Along with the star-studded collaborations, Carti showcases a lot of growth in his sound and establishes himself as a mainstay in the current era of Hip-Hop. Defeating the sophomore myth, Carti’s trendsetting popularity continues to be a must-hear among the wave of new artists.

Playboi Carti developed a cult-like following over the previous years through his selective releasing of music on Soundcloud. Through his affiliations with ASAP Rocky and ASAP Mob, Carti secured a deal with Rocky’s newly developed creative group AWGE and Interscope Records.

Stream Die Lit today, courtesy of AWGE/Interscope.

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Aaron Cohen Wraps A Fruitful 2017 With A Trippy New Video

Every single year I make a heap of predictions about all the artists I’ve dedicated my pen game to—and I’m...

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