interview, Interviews

Bill Cosmiq Interview

At the turn of the millennium, alternative hip-hop label Def Jux was dropping some pretty avant garde shit. The game…

At the turn of the millennium, alternative hip-hop label Def Jux was dropping some pretty avant garde shit. The game was in a weird place – the golden era was over, and we weren’t as deep in the musical “cesspool” we’re engulfed in today. Artists like MF DOOM thrived in this particular pocket of time, as did the harlem duo Cannibal Ox. Rappers Vast Aire and Vordul Mega, over a sound bed provided by El-P (one half of Run the Jewels), released The Cold Vein in 2001, which was acclaimed as one of the best hip-hop albums of the preceding decade. Unfortunately, following a falling out with Def Jux, the duo all but disappeared. After a serious of empty promises of a awaited reunion, they emerged with a dope new album and a new sound. That sound belongs to New York-bred producer/rapper Bill Cosmiq.

I recently had an opportunity to chat with Bill about his music, his influences and how he became the go-to producer for one of hip-hop’s most acclaimed underground groups.


Can you start by introducing yourself to the people?

I’m a producer/emcee based out of New York City. I’m ½ of the group “The Quantum” and lead producer of Cannibal Ox’s Blade of the Ronin album.

How did you get into music?

I’ve made music for years, developing beats for friends and local artists. I never put pressure on myself to record albums in the past. I jumped into the scene in recent years because I wasn’t hearing a lot of music I enjoyed. I was compelled to make a contribution.

What/who were some of your influences?

I’m influenced by all great musicians. Countless people have made an impression on me from Lee “Scratch” Perry to producers like DJ Premier and Timbaland.

Growing up, I remember seeing Quincy Jone’s signature on the back of Chaka Khan albums, movie soundtracks and Michael Jackson’s Thriller album. Seeing those album credits drove my interest in developing music across genres.

How would you describe your sound?

I never put a label on my sound. Once I try to define it, I set an unnecessary boundary. I just try to keep it honest and inspired.

What’s your creative process like when you produce/write?

I try to get in a zone and allow my beats to naturally come together. Sometimes I have a seed of an idea before I sit down and work, but most times I work without an idea of what I want the outcome to be. Discovery is always part of my process.

While making a beat, lyrics start to come to me inspired by what I hear. The music always drives a mood or mindset.

How did The Quantum (Salvador and you) come together?

We’ve known each other for years. We worked on music because we have a similar vision of the records we want to make. The response people had to our collaboration helped to drive the formation of “The Quantum”. No gimmicks or forced music. The Quantum is the middle ground where our creative styles meet.

Can tell us a little about the Paragon EP?

The Paragon EP was an introduction to The Quantum’s sound. It’s a window into our mindset and what we are offering to the culture of Hip Hop and music community at large. I feel like we are bringing the spirit of the “golden era” with a future-forward approach. The EP also features Kenyattah Black, Taj Hotep and Vast Aire.

You are the main producer of the latest Can Ox project, how did that come about?

I linked up with Vast Aire years ago through a mutual friend, Taj Hotep. The first track we released was Royal Purple Bag off of Vast’s A Space Iliad EP. After that, Can Ox and I continued to connect and work on a number of records.

The team really responded to my beats which produced some inspired studio sessions. Ideas exchanged back and forth and the consistency of those sessions helped to fuel the energy behind Blade of the Ronin. It all comes down to chemistry in the lab.

What was the process of putting Blade Of The Ronin together?

I wanted the album to have a cohesive feeling all around. We didn’t rush the creative process. I let things come naturally and the compositions started developing an intense cinematic edge.

After we created “Gotham” in 2013, Cannibal Ox and I started to discuss Ox City and what that environment is like. We discussed the look, tone and feel of that city. Blade of the Ronin is like a soundtrack that illustrates a walk through that environment.

What is your fave song on the album, and why?

I look at the album as a whole. The whole listening experience of the album is favoured.

What’s next for Bill Cosmiq?

I’m focused on producing more quality music and presenting my creative ideas to listeners. The Quantum has a new project in the works and I’ve been collaborating with a diverse range of artists. I’m interested in working on a film score in the near future as well.

…Cannibal Ox and I are still in the shop working on new heat!

Any last words or shoutouts you’d like to leave our blog with?

Shout out to my IGC family and Above Average Hip Hop

Riley here — father, artist, videographer, professional writer and SERIOUS hip-hop head. I'm a member of the Universal Zulu Nation, and I think everything is better on vinyl. Add me on Twitter! @specialdesigns
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Director Myster DL Chats About His New Cypress Hill Documentary

Myster DL, rapper and trusted video director who has an excellent portfolio of over 250 videos with acts like Redman,…

Myster DL, rapper and trusted video director who has an excellent portfolio of over 250 videos with acts like Redman, Sean Price, Styles P, Chuck D, Cormega, and more, recently dropped a new documentary about Cypress Hill, a group he fondly credits for helping him to make Hip Hop himself.

The Haunted Hill Documentary was filmed in one night in Boston, Massachusetts, at the legendary House of Blues. “I worked on the edit for a few days and sent a few drafts over to the guys and management,” DL tells AAHH. “They do a three-day tour annually—and I usually catch a couple of those shows.”

“Earlier this year I had released a video for Cypress Hill’s Eric Bobo, and we are always planning our next project,” he continues. “We are in the process of possibly doing a few music videos for the band.”

As DL explains, he’s been aquatinted with the iconic group for over a decade. “I’ve known B-Real the longest; I met him in roughly 2004 while living—and DJing—in Miami. I made an edited version of his Gunslinger Mixtape and sent it to him via AOL instant messenger. He was grateful and said if I ever needed anything to contact him.”

At first, DL didn’t take the open invitation seriously. “I just thought this was something people say and took a chance and asked him for a verse,” he recalls. “Within two hours I had an email and acappella. I put the verse on my iPod Nano and walked around listening to it for three weeks. We did a song together in 2004, and that blossomed into a cool relationship with the whole crew.”

“I have a song with B Real, Sticky Fingaz, Rockness Monsta and Kool G Rap that will premier on the soundtrack of my next film,” DL says proudly. “Cypress Hill inspired me to make music which eventually turned into a successful film career, so its a trip to even know them.”

According to DL, this is his most significant project to date. “It’s my first documentary film; however I do have a series of short documentaries called “Rewind The Scenes” where I look back at the making of some of my biggest music videos,” he explains.

The Haunted Hill Documentary is a must-watch for any Cypress fan; check it out below.

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Sam Krow Is Ready For 2018 [Interview]

Sam Krow a.k.a. Hunnit Block from Dade County, Florida (by way of Little Haiti), has been featured on our site…

Sam Krow a.k.a. Hunnit Block from Dade County, Florida (by way of Little Haiti), has been featured on our site in the past. His single “Hunnit” featuring Zoey Dollaz—who is having serious run right now—and his Black On Black mixtape put him on the map within his local scene, and his upcoming EP Zoe Boy promises to open him up to the world.

“[My sound] is down south blended with the heartbeat of the islands,” he tells AAHH. “My mother was my inspiration. Before she died we listened to music together; then, when she died I used the memory of my mom as my pain reliever—my tranquility place. My anger releaser,” he continues. “That’s when I was motivated to do what I wanted to do in life…to make my mom proud.”

“My influence was the black stars in my neighborhood,” he told us, noting he was musically fuelled by Biggie, Pac, Bob Marley, Michel Martelly, Wyclef and the Fugees, Trick, Uncle Luke, and MMG capo Rick Ross.

He has a lot to look forward to, especially following the success of “Hunnit” which peaked at 83 on the national DRT charts—and number 8 the indie DRT chart. “[My goal is] to build a legacy, not only for my children but my people,” he says confidently. With a freshman album on deck for 2018 and a major tour in the works, it’s only a matter of time before Sam’s name is mentioned in larger industry circles.

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An Interview with RnB Singer Marcylis

“My music is just different. It’s a new soundscape, new melodies, a new flow and a fresh face.”-Marcylis It’s been…

“My music is just different. It’s a new soundscape, new melodies, a new flow and a fresh face.”-Marcylis

It’s been a while since we’ve received a fresh, attractive, young male R&B singer that caters to the soul. Marcylis is a 21 year old serenader hailing from Atlanta, GA, working towards his anticipated reality–R&B superstar. With already having dropped singles such as “Gang,” “Doing The Most,” and his first single “My Girl,” Marcylis has collectively gained attention–accumulating over 47.3k plays on SoundCloud and 3.7k followers on Instagram. Showing much potential in his craft and brand, I found it only right that I interview him and introduce him to the AAHH family. Read more below.

An Interview with RnB Singer Marcylis

AC: When did you decide that football wasn’t your passion, but singing was?

M: I decided sports wasn’t the route I wanted to take when I had made the decision to move to Atlanta, at that point I knew I wanted to do something different, take another route.

AC: I read that you’re from Cincinnati, but now reside in Atlanta, did you find better opportunity for stardom there (since that’s everyone’s perception of ATL)?

M: I’m not really a geographical type of person my advice to anyone pursuing a dream or goal is to build a team of people in your field of interest, start there, and if you can’t leave from where your at then do it at home, do it from where your at. But do it at your BEST and make sure it’s a good listening experience that people can relate to, and or vibe to.

AC: Who are some of your musical inspirations or influences? Why?

 M: Some of my musical influences are artists like Jagged Edge, Omarion, Jodeci, New Edition, and R. Kelly. I could relate to their music and they gave off good vibes–something you would listen to on repeat. I would say Drake and Chris Brown… but my inspiration truly comes from life experiences and my environment.

AC: Walk me through the creative process when writing your music or recording a song?

M: First I hum to find a melody, then I start to freestyle with the flow of the beat. Once I find the rhythm and the melody, I put words next to them.

An Interview with RnB Singer Marcylis

AC: In today’s music, no one really has one sound any more. What would you describe your “sound” to be like?

M: My music is just different. It’s a new soundscape, new melodies, a new flow and a fresh face.

AC: I read that you come from a musical family who has always surrounded you with the musical tools needed. Was your family always supportive of your decision to pursue music?

M: Yes my family loves music and has always been supportive.

AC: Who do you dream of working with in the music industry?

M: It would be dope to work with Drake, Chris Brown, Bryson Tiller, SZA, Her, Ella, Justine Skye and PartyNextDoor.

AC: You’re planning on dropping project, ‘820′ Where did the concept for this title come from? It looks like a date, if so why THIS date?

M: August 20th is my birthday. So every event from that day I was born that I can remember, up until today–I am going to make a career off of reminiscing.

AC: What are some of your favorite tracks from the project and why?

M: The whole project.

AC: In today’s music industry, artists have found ways to build their brand other than music, such as dabbling in the fashion industry, producing and acting. What avenues do you see yourself going into, besides music?

M: I’m also an actor, so winning a few Oscar awards and Best New Breakout Actor are on my bucket list. Along with starring in big major movies and on television. I also want to jump into the virtual world and design a few video games… making big major moves to broaden myself as a brand. An Interview with RnB Singer Marcylis

AC: What do you think about the state of Hip Hop right now? Especially being a singer trying to break into the game.

M: The state of Hip Hop is always changing, so be UNIQUE.

AC: Are you looking to get signed or do you believe in taking the independent route, like many artists out right now?

M: If it makes sense and looks good who knows.

AC: What is next for Marcylis?

M: I will be finishing out 2017 going into production, set to film a movie. I will be dropping my album “820” and pushing a few other singles; Problems, My Girl, Working So Hard, and Replay along with filming music videos. Word on the streets is a Jodeci biopic is reportedly coming to VH1 this year and I had a huge social media buzz to play the lead singer, Dalvin.

Check out Marcylis’ music by clicking the links below.

Let me know if your feeling Marcylis using the hashtag #ACapproves

An Interview with RnB Singer Marcylis

An Interview with RnB Singer Marcylis

 

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Live Interview with Rapper Ish Williams BTS at Soultronica Music Fest

Ish Williams is a South Jersey rapper bringing his own resonance to hip-hop. With inspired drive from Kid Cudi, Ish Williams…

Ish Williams is a South Jersey rapper bringing his own resonance to hip-hop. With inspired drive from Kid Cudi, Ish Williams speaks of personal issues in most of the songs that he creates. He brings an energy that has Jersey written all over. With already gaining attention from huge platforms like Vibe, The Source, HypeFresh Magazine, Genius, ItsBizKit, and Hot New Hip-Hop, to say the least, Ish Williams shows his consistency and perseverance.

Live Interview with Rapper Ish Williams BTS at Soultronica Music Fest

While backstage at the Soultronica Music Fest in Philly, I caught up with Ish Williams to finally get to know him in person, and discuss the purpose of Soultronica–mental health awareness. He has a dope solo project out right now ‘Sonia’s Son’ and a collective project “W.A.W.A” with some other notable names like Mir Fontaine, available everywhere now. Watch now

Make sure you follow him by clicking the links below

Live Interview with Rapper Ish Williams BTS at Soultronica Music Fest
Live Interview with Rapper Ish Williams BTS at Soultronica Music Fest

Live Interview with Rapper Ish Williams BTS at Soultronica Music Fest

Live Interview with Rapper Ish Williams BTS at Soultronica Music Fest

 

 

 

 

 

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