interview, Interviews, unsigned hype

infectiously Optimistic: Meet Rapper Noah Wright

“I can fit into any role I can see myself in,” he says adamantly. “It’s just a matter of preparation and timing.“

Phoenix, Arizona, rapper Noah Wright—aka Daddy Fat Staxxx aka Phoenix The Misfit—was initially born in Iowa. “I’m cooling in the devil’s backyard,” he tells AAHH with a laugh. “I write music, balance my chakras, enjoy long walks to the bank, and occasionally getting caught up in some ratchet shit.”

“My music is life man.” he says when asked about his influences. “I’m inspired by my experiences, my family, friends, even my enemies … I feel have a message to give.” That message he’s describing finds its way into his music. “I just find the beat that I feel fits that conversation vibe the best,” he continues. “Almost like watching a movie on mute then choosing what you feel fits that scene best, but you are the creator and director of the whole operation.”

He fondly recalls how it al started when his family moved to Las Vegas. “I moved to [Vegas], and I met my friend Chris. He told me he was rapping and had a studio in his garage. One day I decided to check it out … it’s been on and popping ever since.”

When asked what he’s dropped so far, he laughs and states “Not enough,” before explaining, “I have too many songs that I create, maybe get halfway through and stash to revisit later but later rarely comes. As far as this year, I’ve dropped two singles and my tape Love, Noah.”

“I still got a long ways to go,” he says laying out his two-year plan to us. “I’ll tell my people about more as I wrap things up. Currently, I’m working on my next tape, two music videos, and upcoming performances.”

Among his most significant career achievements to date, he fondly cites meeting the legendary Rakim and opening up for him, and premiering—and selling out—a short film with his director Tony Kure. “We premiered it at Arizona Mills Mall and sold out,” he says. “It was wild yo.”

“My goal used to be to find a label, but at this point, I’ve given up on that desire,” he explains, noting that he wants to achieve financial stability independently. “[I want] my music to help me sustain the life I’m living now.”

Noah is on an ascent, and his confidence is infectious. “I can fit into any role I can see myself in,” he says adamantly. “It’s just a matter of preparation and timing.”

Check his latest project, below.

Top music, fashion and sneaker picks by our wonderful team! Follow our Twitter!
Related Articles
unsigned hype

Rapper Tuu Ra Combines Metaphysics Into His Music

His latest single, “Get Something” is worth a spin!

Tuu Ra, representing Brooklyn, has been writing and producing music since the young age of 14. Using a keyboard his mother gave him, and being introduced to fruity loops daw on his laptop by his father, he began a journey that he’s been on ever since, combining spiritual training and deep-rooted knowledge of metaphysics into his always evolving music and art (he’s multi-disciplinary).

“I was introduced to creating music by my father who is also a musician,” he tells AAHH. “Writing was always a strength for me.” With early influences that include the likes of Lupe Fiasco, Talib Kweli, Rakim, Krs One, his love of the meticulous attention to the art itself emanates from his work.

“On the production side I drew inspiration from Dilla, 9th wonder, Pharrell, and Ryan Leslie to name a few,” he adds. He dropped a mixtape in 2014 titled Nu Perception, and a beat tape two years later titled Hip Hop Archives — on top of a handful of singles.

His sound is versatile, from old soulful hip-hop waves that have long since dispersed since hitting the rocks, to today’s trap vibes that are flooding the streets. His latest “Get Something” — for example — is overflowing with lyrical content, an atmospheric instrumental, and a high quality visual — with tons of movement and engaging transitions. It’s when you take time to listen to his bars; you can hear his teachings scattered throughout.

 
“I practice Qi Gong, which is the grandmother of Tai Qi, and meditate often,” he says. “This helps a lot in my creative process while giving me resilience as I navigate this [tough] music business. Currently, he is working on an album; “my focus is collaborating with other producers to create a different sound,” he notes, adding that he’s looking to drop it by the end of this upcoming fall.

Currently living in between the mecca and sunny LA, he’s been making new connections. “You can look forward to hearing the east coast west coast vibe in my upcoming project … my next goal is to expand overseas and book more gigs. I love traveling and look forward to sharing my music with a broader and more diverse audience.

With new connections in the UK, and enjoying a brewing creative run, Tuu Ra is in an exciting space. Stay tuned — and add him to your socials @tuugod.

Continue Reading
#IndieSpotlight, unsigned hype

Detroit’s Own Arius Is Our New Singer Crush

She has a gorgeous voice, and a great vibe about her.

23-year-old Detroit-native Arius is a star on the rise with a cadence that commands attention; her debut LP Pandora’s Box dropped last summer — and she’s about to drop another project this summer.

Her latest, the super impressive “4U,” is an airy R&B appetizer that’s building buzz as she finalizes her upcoming project Reality. The track itself gives off an aura reminiscent of Ashanti’s “Foolish,” in that it’s easily relatable for many females, making it an almost anthemic single that you could picture a packed audience singing along to. It definitely has replay potential.

Having rocked shows in cultural hubs like LA, Miami, and ATL — and releasing her music through independent label MafiaSoul Records — the songstress has her sights set on a major label look.

She has a gorgeous voice, and a great vibe about her; she’s an artist to put on your watch list. Check owut “4U,” below.

 

Continue Reading
unsigned hype

TreCartel’s Latest Single “Rock-N-Roll” Is The Wave

Born in the borough of Queens, but raised in the cultural hotbed that is Atlanta,  Georgia, rapper TreCartel — an…

Born in the borough of Queens, but raised in the cultural hotbed that is Atlanta,  Georgia, rapper TreCartel — an esteemed vet who served in the US Air Force — is on a musical journey. “My grandfather would create beats on fruity loops while I was in high school,” he says about his beginnings in the game. “My friend [made beats] as well. I started recording music when I came home from the Military in 2014.

To date, he’s released three projects,  ‘Pharaoh Muzik,’ ‘Pharaoh Muzik 2’ and ‘GoldMind’—along with a handful of singles available via all popular streaming networks.

His latest single, Rock-N-Roll, is an airy song that rides the current wave effortlessly, with a catchy chorus and vibe perfect for late night drives — or strip club vibes. Definitely worth a few spins! While you’re at it, check out “Stay Away,” also on his SoundCloud.

Check it out, below.

Continue Reading
interview, Interviews

Cold War: An Interview With Rising Upstart Cautious Clay

We spoke to Cautious about his musical influences, creative process, and a fated trip to Korea that changed his life.

Cautious Clay burst onto the scene last September with the release of his debut single, “Cold War,” and hasn’t looked back since. The former leasing agent marketer has progressed at a torrid pace since the impressive drop, accomplishing more in nine months than most artists do in an entire career: he’s racked up millions of plays on Spotify alone, performs throughout the country, and is already being hounded by major labels. He re-released his debut EP, Blood Type, attached with an extra track, “Stolen Moments,” in April and is already slated to release a new EP by the end of May. We spoke to Cautious about his musical influences, creative process, and a fated trip to Korea that changed his life. You can check it all out, below.

Not even a year ago, you were working as a leasing agent marketer. What was it like working a 9-5 as a passionate musician?

I was fortunate enough to find a way to make a living out of college. But, besides that, it was still something that I realized, even though I was making money, it wasn’t in a way in which I was happy. As cheesy as it sounds, I’m kind of a guy of my convictions and I didn’t relate to anyone else at my job. It was super soul-sucking.

And what made you finally take the leap of faith and quit?

Long story short, I had been making beats and stuff for several years and had a lot of weird ass beats up on my Soundcloud. The head of a Korean label sent me an email almost three years ago, in 2015, saying he wanted me to come out to Korea to work. At first I said, “That’s ridiculous,” and I ignored it. A year later, my manager was going out to Korea for a vacation and asked a friend of his if there was anyone he should meet while out there. He was introduced to the same guy that cold-emailed me years ago and they were like, “We have to get him to Korea.”

I was still working in corporate throughout those years and basically had no vacation time, I had like one or two days, and I took unpaid days off too and was like cool, I wanna do this. I basically ended up producing eight songs for these semi-big Korean artists; that was super surreal for me. The fact that I did that, I was like okay this is a sign. The beats were just some stuff I was working on like on a plane ride or making randomly, so I realized if I really just put 100% of my efforts into this and focused, maybe I could make a career out of this. One of the songs I produced ended up being nominated for a Korean Hip-Hop Award.

Growing up in Cleveland, how did the city influence you musically, i.e., Kid Cudi or Bone Thugs-N-Harmony? Sometimes your voice sounds eerily similar to Kid Cudi’s, although you’re different stylistically.

It’s funny you say Bone Thugs because they lived in Mayfield Heights, not too far from me. I think in terms of inspirations growing up, I would say that Cudi was surprisingly not a huge influence, I had always heard about his stuff and kinda listened to it peripherally but I never really got into it, funny enough. Not that I don’t like him as an artist, but he was never super inspiring for me.

You said in a past interview that you’re heavily influenced by Hip-Hop. Which artists in particular?

Today, there’s some artists I really like even just because of a couple verses that they’ve done. I really love Earl Sweatshirt’s verse on, “Super Rich Kids.” I think he’s incredibly talented and I really fuck with his stuff. Obviously Andre 3000 is amazing. Sometimes stylistically I’m really into Ugly God too, he’s of a genre that I love because it’s the most self-deprecating, he’s just funny.

And which artists overall?

I was super into a lot of different stuff, a lot of stuff my parents turned me onto early on, I kinda didn’t accept at first as most kids wouldn’t, but it kinda comes back around. I listened to a lot of RnB, Pop Punk; Green Day, Lil Bow Wow, 50 Cent, a bunch of pop of just in the early 2000’s and late 90’s was around the house and in my ears. In my teens I was a really big jazz head and played in a jazz band.

Which artists would you most like to collaborate with?

I’m really stoked actually to collaborate, I think I might be working with Duckwrth pretty soon, I really like his stuff. I would definitely say Kendrick Lamar, he’s so sick, that’d definitely be the dream collab. Otherwise I’m kinda open to different ideas in terms of collaborations. Someone like Alina Baraz might be cool or SZA. Maybe even in a production sense it could be interesting.

 
As a poly-instrumentalist, front man and songwriter, what’s the creative process like for you in terms of collaboration? Do you do most everything alone or like to include others in the process?

That’s a great question, I’m kind of grappling with that right now because I do get hit up for a lot of production and collabs, and it’s easiest sometimes for me to just be by myself and just make everything on my own. But there are some situations where I’ve been collaborating with people lately, on my next project I have one co-production, everything else is on my own. That’s a good example of someone having a cool sound, something I admire, and I’ll work with them for that particular reason. But in general I definitely feel like it’s difficult because I am a producer, so if a producer wants to work with me you gotta be good, cause I can already do this.

Blood Type seems to cover lots of topics regarding relationships, specifically, people struggling to stay present in the digital age. Would you say the whole E.P. is based on this theme or is the project more so general observation?

I would say it’s more of a general observation and that’s just a part of it. I try to toe the line and not be preachy in how people lead their lives, I like to have more of a reflective mentality about it. Everyone has a different perspective on things and I wanted to show my interpretation of how I see things. That stems back to the title, Blood Type, representing my identity in a grander sense. It’s purposefully trying to highlight my perspective on relationships and on things people might wanna consider or think more about in their own lives. I’m not trying to say you’re bad for using Tinder, of course, use Tinder! But kind of like hey, this is where we’re at and this is okay but also just realize that you can live your life in a lot of different ways.

From a songwriting perspective, are all of your songs based on your personal experiences or do you draw inspiration from elsewhere?

Mostly, 80-90%, my experiences because for me, that’s the easiest way to feel that what I’m saying is authentic. It’s weird for me me to try to do something if it doesn’t feel right. I think today is the coolest time to just be yourself, so, that’s all I can do.

Stay independent or sign?

I think I’m definitely gonna stay independent for the near future, but down the line, if an opportunity comes about that makes sense for me, I would definitely consider that.

What’s on the horizon for Cautious Clay?

Yeah, right now I’m actually working on putting out my next project at the end of May. It’s something I’m pretty stoked about, it’s a 3-4 song E.P. There’s gonna be a video and some pretty cool artwork that my friend Lane is working on, he did all of the artwork for the last project. I’m playing a show at Bowery on July 24th. I’m just stoked to keep it moving, it’s a fun one for sure.

Continue Reading
More in interview, Interviews, unsigned hype
Ghost Unknown Unleashes A Decade Long Labor Of Love

It's often understood that the most enduring music comes from a more personal place--whether reflections and understanding of personal truths...

Close