interview, Interviews

Still Ugly After All These Years: The Atmosphere Interview

“You should’ve seen the look on my face, when I was losing faith. Y’all got me in hesitation, embarrassment. I…

“You should’ve seen the look on my face, when I was losing faith. Y’all got me in hesitation, embarrassment. I might be the last generation of grandparents,” Slug raps on “Virgo,” the harrowing lead single from Atmosphere’s latest LP, Mi Vida Local.

Weeks following the release of “Virgo” – one of the most stripped-down and tense records in Atmosphere’s expansive catalog – the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) revealed the planet could reach a point of catastrophic effects from global warming by 2030.

Slug said Mi Vida Local, came from a place of “desperation” as a father worried about his children and future generations.

“I think all of that just really speaks to just fucking adulthood and fatherhood,” he said about the album’s tone. “Shit that you just kind of start to learn to confront and acknowledge inside of your fears and your thoughts. When you start to think about being responsible for more than just your own self.”

 

Mi Vida Local serves as the third of an accidental trilogy dating back to 2014’s Southsiders, when for the first time, Ant wasn’t in the studio working with Slug in Minnesota. For the past three records – Southsiders, Fishing Blues and Mi Vida Local – Ant has worked in California with studio musician G Koop, who has since landed production/writing credits on hits such as Migos’ “Bad and Boujee,” 2 Chainz’s “It’s a Vibe” and DJ Khaled’s “I Got the Keys.”

Slug said without having Ant in the studio with him, he wrote more autonomously and was able to explore deeper themes of death and mortality.

“I was kind of given this freedom to explore kind of what mortality meant to me,” the Minnesota emcee said. “So once I got into it and seeing what I was doing, I was like, well I like the three different approaches to mortality. The first approach is to see death as something you’re afraid of. And the second one is the exact opposite – to see death as something that you can embrace. And you go okay, then fuck it, I accept it. And then the third one is to see death as life. Death is living, and that’s this one, Mi Vida Local. Death is a living, actual almost organic being, an organism. As if death is personified as something that is alive. So it’s like death through life, or life through death. However you want to look at that.”

During a brief break in their hectic touring schedule, Slug spoke with Above Average Hip-Hop about the duo’s latest record, their recent reissues, Atmosphere’s legacy and how his songwriting has evolved over the years.

Still Ugly After All These Years: The Atmosphere Interview
 
Above Average Hip-Hop: You’re about to re-issue When Life Gives You Lemons, you re-packaged the Sad Clown Seasonal EPs earlier this year, and re-released Overcast! last year. When you guys re-release these records, do you ever go back and listen to them? And how do you feel revisiting these records after 10 and 20 years?

Slug: You know, I don’t really revisit the music too much, unless I’m intending to grab some of the songs for the show. Then I’ll go and revisit those songs just to see if I still remember the words, for starters, but also just to see what I can do to update the songs. You know, how I’m going to fit them into what we’re doing.

So with that said, I spend more time looking at the packaging and working on trying to figure out what I want this product to look like, or feel like. How I want that to affect how people take it. We’ve put effort into that with new releases or with reissues. We always like to the album – and when I say album I’m referring to the vinyl because that’s kind of all I care about, I don’t care about digital or CDs. I’m a collector, I collect vinyl, so I want my shit to feel good. I want to be able to feel solid when you hold it, when you look at it. And that’s kind of where I’m at with the reissues as well.

The label likes to do the reissues because it gives them an opportunity to try and correct the shit they did wrong the first time, you know. They get like a second chance to make it cool, which I think for like an album like Overcast!, there’s a million reasons why that was important, or The Dynospectrum for example. But for Lemons, shit man, that was a pretty decent package the first time. So when they said they were going to reissue I was like, well I don’t know what the hell you’re going to make this better. But I’m pretty happy with what they come back with. They did the book for the full-size vinyl, which is kind of crazy.

 
Maybe it was because I was like 17 and 18 when those projects came out, but I always felt like Lemons and the Sad Clown EPs were among your best work or at least some of my personal favorites. Was there anything that stood out during those sessions, where it felt like you were just in a great creative zone?

Slug: No, we didn’t. And I can speak on behalf of both of us. We didn’t know what we were doing – just like every other album. We were just making what we enjoyed making at the time. You know it’s funny too because when the record came out, there were plenty of people that didn’t like it. There were plenty of people –even with the Sad Clowns – there were plenty of people that pushed back against it and said we want God Loves Ugly. We want Lucy Ford.

And so it’s interesting to hear you say that when you were 17 and that came out, you actually liked it for what it was. Most people don’t like our shit until it’s been out for a year. And then once it’s been out for like a year, people will be like oh yeah, that was good. Even with God Loves Ugly – man, when we put that record out, and I remember the reviews that came in on that album were very negative. And then now people are like that’s your classic or some shit.

But I kinda think that’s been part of why we’ve enjoyed the type of career we’ve enjoyed. It’s that maybe don’t make the kind of music that’s meant to be absorbed and appreciated in one listen, you know what I mean? Maybe that first listen is supposed to be like, “yeah I don’t know how I feel about it.” And then after you revisit a month later, or even a year later, you realize that it grew on you. Not because it’s amazing music but because it’s honest. And a lot of the stuff we use in the moment isn’t meant to be honest, it’s just meant to give us that quick gratification. And we don’t really make quick gratification music.

So that’s why I often watch people make their top 10 album lists of the year, and we don’t make those lists. But then, when I look at who did make that list in 2011, those artists aren’t even around anymore [laughs]. And I’ve come to accept that that’s kind of our place.

 
You said Ant was out in California for the last few projects, was he working with G Koop out there? Do they sit in a room together and work? I know you’ve been working with him since Southsiders, but in the last couple of years, he’s kind of blown up. He’s done stuff with the Migos and 21 Savage. Do you feel like you were kind of in early on this technique of having a musician create samples?

It’s hard to say. He’s been doing this a long time; way longer than us and the Migos. When he works with us, it’s different than when he works with 21 Savage. With us, you don’t have to worry about what the results are going to be [laughs]. You know what I mean? That worked, that didn’t work. We keep the mistakes. We’re not here to make polished shit. We’re not here to make music for people to like, man. We make music to challenge people.

Now granted, we don’t get to challenge the world. The world doesn’t give a fuck about us. But the people that do like us, I need to challenge them. We have to challenge them to like us. We have to make it difficult to like us. And I know that sounds stupid or corny. I don’t mean it to sound as corny as it sounds, but it’s like, otherwise I’d just make God Loves Ugly 2. But I feel like the point of [Atmosphere], is to go well, we have an audience, let’s see what we can do to force them to decide if they still like us.

When you play shows and talk to these kids afterward, do you feel like the new work is received as well as your older stuff?

I like how you said kids, that’s funny, cause there are no kids anymore. It’s all grown-ups with problems [laughs]. I say it like this – it depends on when you discover us. If you are 24 the first time you hear us, you’re going to gravitate towards the music I was making when I was that age. If you discovered us when you were 33, you’re going to like Lemons the most.

I feel like the music we’re making right now, if you’re 24, I do believe you can find a way to appreciate this, but in time you may really appreciate it more when it starts to address the shit that’s going on in your world. I feel like that’s kind of the beauty of this shit. It’s not really timeless like they say. Art is not as timeless as we like to pretend. It captures a moment in time. Like, if you were 16, and you said your favorite record by Atmosphere was Fishing Blues, that would make me nervous. Cause it would be like, what are you relating to on that as a 16-year-old? What kind of trauma did you experience that allows you to relate to some of the songs that are on there, you know what I mean?

It really kind of depends on who you are, what you’re thinking, and what you are when you discover the shit that we’re doing. And I feel like it usually makes full sense to me. The people that are like, yo my favorite shit by you is Overcast!. And I’m like you’re fucking 19, that should be your favorite shit. Holler at me in 15 years, and tell me what your favorite shit is then, you know?

 
The writing on this album feels a lot denser and metaphor-heavy than your last couple albums. It reminds me a lot of the early Atmosphere days, was this style of writing something that you were pushing yourself to do?

I don’t even know. I can’t call it. To me, all this shit is metaphor heavy. I’ve never made a record that’s not metaphor-heavy, in my world. But at the same time, I guess when I look at a song like “Chasing New York,” off the last album, it probably just sounds like an East Coast beat, circa 1997 underground rap type shit. That’s probably what it is, but in my world, no that shit’s a fucking huge metaphor for something.

My experiences with these songs are way different from anybody else’s. To me, it’s all very dense, all of it’s very heavy. Because it’s all my shit, it’s all my experiences. It’s all the things that have formed me into who I am. So sometimes I think I might be standing too close it, to answer a question like that, you know what I mean? I can’t be held accountable for, or even begin to understand what people are getting out of this shit.

So you don’t think you’ve ever tried to – for a lack of a better phrase – dumb down your lyrics to get a message through?

I’ve definitely had times where I’ve been like, okay, what I want to communicate in this song? I don’t want people to misinterpret it. So I might make sure I nail a line or two that I put some stuff in there, usually a starter line. Or make sure the important points of the song is easy to interpret, just because in the past I’ve definitely had moments where I regretted not doing that.

I got songs that people have misinterpreted to the point where it was, I thought, detrimental to my relationship with those people. Especially some of the earlier shit that people took as super negative. People thought I’ve had lots of drug problems. There are certain things that people have taken from my music where I’m like, yo that was never something I wanted you to take. But then again, as I said, I can’t be responsible for what you interpret, but I can be responsible for what I allow you to have.

I would never say that I’ve tried to dumb down because that’s a fucking shitty way to see your audience. I don’t think the audience is dumb, so I don’t have to dumb down to talk to them. If anything, I think they look harder, they look too deep into my shit sometimes. And that’s why I’ve sometimes been more careful to make sure to be direct. Not because I gotta be dumb for them, but because if I’m not extra direct, they’re going to be like, this is about this.

 
In a recent interview, you referred to Atmosphere as a legacy act, in the sense that you’re really only competing with yourself at this point. How do you think the new album fits within your legacy?

I mean, I don’t know how to answer that. It’s perfect in the sense that it’s the exact thing that needs to occur between the last album and the next album. Every single step is exactly what it’s supposed to be – for better or for worse. And so if this album is horrible – that’s okay because that’s what it’s supposed to be in order to get us to our failure that we have to get to. Or maybe this album is amazing, and that’s okay because that’s what it’s supposed to be in order to get us to our success.

How do you feel like the last couple of records sit next to the rest of your catalog?

Here, we’ll take Fishing Blues for example. I think Fishing Blues was a really great album to me, the way that Seven’s Travels was. It’s not one of my favorite projects that I’ve done, but what it did was, it was almost like the kitchen sink. Seven’s Travels was like what else, what else can we put on here? And that’s how we approached it. Fishing Blues had a version of that, but it was way more stitched together from a conceptual standpoint. Whereas Seven’s Travels, all of that conceptual shit, we stitched that together last minute. That wasn’t really there, we made the shit. When we made Seven’s Travels… that was the height of the of people trying to fill the CD up with 80 minutes of music. So we were trying to fill it with 80 minutes without getting boring, you know.

I’ll say it like this, Seven’s Travels might be my least favorite Atmosphere album of all time, and Fishing Blues might be my favorite Atmosphere album of all time. But not because the songs are good or bad, but because Fishing Blues is an artistically successful attempt at what Seven’s Travels failed at. And I wasn’t trying to create an artistically successful Seven’s Travels, that was just something I saw in hindsight when it was all over with. But Fishing Blues was everything but the kitchen sink, yet it stitched together naturally. It just worked. We didn’t have to put stupid little interludes in between the songs in order to tie them together. It all just made sense to me as a piece. Whereas Seven’s Travels, to this day I’m like, man why did we put that on there? Why did we do that? Why would we put this song next to that song?

“Lifter Puller” should’ve been on God Loves Ugly. I had the song when we made God Loves Ugly, why didn’t we put that on God Loves Ugly, you know what I mean? Seven’s Travels is full of mistakes, whereas Fishing Blues just organically came together the way it was supposed to. We were recording that while Anthony was going through a lot of life stuff, brand new life stuff for him. So I’ll always have an attachment to Fishing Blues for that because it’s always going to be a snapshot of this time in our life.

 
What keeps you driven to continue touring and making new music? Do you ever think that inspiration will run out?

I don’t know about that. To me, it’s about the fun. If I ever stop having fun doing this stuff, I’m not gonna do it. I’ve been fortunate enough to work myself into a position where there are other streams of income and there are other things in my world that I can do, and so I’m not dependent on music the way that I was 10-12 years ago. So now, it’s really like, fun. And that’s the funny thing. Now that I don’t necessarily need to get on TV and convince people to buy my music, that’s when people go, why are you still doing it?

Like now, the relationship I have with my music is way purer than it was when I needed you to buy it. Now I’m able to write a song without considering or giving a fuck about if anybody’s ever going to like it. Like for real, for real. As an artist, we would always say things like, I make my music for me. I don’t care if anybody likes it. That’s a lie. You want people to like it, so they will buy it, so they will buy t-shirts so that you can pay your phone bill. Well now that’s no longer the problem, you get to re-evaluate your relationship with your music. And that’s what I’ve gotten to do since Family Sign.

Family Sign was when I finally realized like, what a minute, like the records are still selling, but it’s okay if they stop. We’ll be okay. So now I can really get free. I can really write a song about wanting to fuck my wife, without worrying about anybody being like, “this is a stupid song. Why would anybody listen to this?”

Photos by: Dan Monick

This interview was edited for length and clarity.

interview, Interviews

#Interview Mark Spratley AKA @SpratFool Is Proving You Don’t Need Clout Tokens To Solidify A Musical Empire

Mark Spratley is a name in the industry you certainly should get acquainted with. A master of many, creating an…

Mark Spratley is a name in the industry you certainly should get acquainted with. A master of many, creating an entity in so many different lanes within the industry from management, PR, writing, events, curation and much more. Within five years of the industry, Sprat has accomplished what takes many 20-30 years. The young 27-year-old mogul is creating an empire before our eyes, and it only seems to be getting more and more impressive. Why wouldn’t it?! From helping to bring artists such as Lud Foe, DDG, DaBaby, Smooky Margielaa, Albee Al, Sicko Mobb, Nikko Lafre and many more to the limelight, his resume is vast.

Take a look at our most recent interview with the Starting Five CEO as we discuss music, how to get in the industry, his journey and much more.

Make sure to follow Sprat on Twitter and IG @SpratFool

You’ve been in the music industry for only five years and have already created something massive. How did you do it and what is planned for the future?

Countless hours, grind, plotting and studying. I’ve learned, and LVL’d UP. That’s it. I knew if I put in the work, I would find a way. I go 3000% for whatever I do or whoever I work with. Some people make the same moves and expect things to change. Some people aren’t willing to starve to binge forever. I’m out here mastering and succeeding at whatever I do. I make sure of it. I’ve got an insane ear for music, that’s been known. That’s why some of your favorite A&R’s would be asking me to pull up to their office on the regular.

I’m here to take over though. I’m going to continue to put people into position and maintain my brand. The empire is forming; the foundation has been laid and built.

We recently saw in another interview that you have a new platform on the way? What’re the details on that? (If you can give us any)

NEW DAY, NEW WAVE (LITERALLY). Zias (Popular youtube star &influencer) and I are partnering up on a new media outlet x platform for something special. We’re about to surpass the field quick. Two powerful influencers, we already got the traffic between both of us, both widely connected. Run it up!

Bunch of content on the way from both of us

If you could tell someone looking to get into the industry one piece of advice, what would it be?

GRIND SMART. Bring something to the table. Your passion and time can go a long way. Learn. Be willing to do what the next man is not.

Do you know how much free time and work I gave out to get to where I am now?! Now my time costs. Money isn’t everything, in the beginning, work for your opportunity. People worried about $20-$5000 (Short term money) when sometimes you just need to see the bigger picture.

You wouldn’t want everyone to bring ketchup to the BBQ; you need someone to bring the bun, the burger, the juice, the drink and everything else. Do you feel me?! Same goes for the industry or any job you do in life. Bring something different to the table and create a demand for it. That’s when you create stock for yourself (You create worth).

What were you doing before becoming a music mogul?

I was doing the school thing before I decided to leave for music full time. I was making money however I needed to.

What new artists do you have your eye on?

NEW SIGNINGS on the way. I’m getting back in my artist bag 3000%. Look out for all of that. I got to hold my list down for the time being.

How did you get into PR?

Fresh Moss and Neako had me on a lot of PR type of moves early. I always studied and noticed was going on in the game. Got tired of hitting up a lot of these foolish and corny “Bloggers” and people that were out and around at the time that felt entitled. A lot of them aren’t even around anymore haha. Many didn’t want to see someone else moving faster or making something out of all this. I decided to take everything into my own hands. From then on I turned this PR wave into something masterful. Countless artists have popped off since through my PR, their ability and me connecting these dots on the daily.

Top 5 modern artists most likely in your daily music mix?

It all depends on the day and mood

Lately… DaBaby, pre kai ro, Lil Baby, YNW Melly, Stunna 4 Vegas & DaiDough. I’ve been bumping FBG Duck heavily as of late; bro got energy.

A few artists are rising out of New Jersey that you’ve been alerting us about for over a year or 2. From Daidough to Coi Leray and many more. New Jersey has some talent for sure, how do you think your state will hold up in 2019?

New Jersey is UP right now, and it’s only going to get crazier. A lot of artists doing their thing. Daidough got home and been going stupid. Coi Leray has been spazzing since G.A.N.

Albee Al doing him as always, Tsu Surf home and just dropped a fire project, Arsonal on damn TV, Fatboy SSE is outta here and in his lane, Mir Fontane been putting in work. Jersey got a wide variety of sounds, every city/town is different, North and South Jersey completely different.

Beyond the artists, there are so many talented people coming up out of NJ and doing their thing in this music industry or elsewhere. It’s great to see people winning from your home state.

We remember you going crazy at SXSW with Smooky Margielaa a few years back when he was only an artist with a 10k following, how did you all meet?

Shit, my man Mike had told me I had to bump something while we were in LA. The track happened to be ‘Layed up,’ heard it and it was a wrap for me. His mans was GRAPE, we were all in LA, so we all linked up at the apartment, vibed and got to work immediately. Started putting in that push, went to SXSW and went full force after SXSW. Glad to see Smooky up right now.

We dove into your Twitter and did a little google search on you while doing some more research. We saw you got into it a little with Akademiks online last year? LOL, tell us more?

LMAO! If you did some research like you said I’m sure you know what was said. Jersey people certainly don’t tolerate bullshit. I called BS on something he spoke on. Jersey got behind it. That’s it.

What ever happened to Nikko Lafre?

Man, I can’t speak on another man that’s not with me. We had something crazy growing, that’s where I’m going to leave it.

Drew Love out here winning though with THEY, Lee Beats out here winning, Johnny Rain out here still doing his thing up.

#Interview Mark Spratley AKA @SpratFool Is Proving You Don't Need Clout Tokens To Solidify A Musical Empire

Thoughts on R Kelly latest situation and documentary?

SHEESH! I don’t want to believe it, but it’s their right before our eyes. It’s a shame because his music and voice are legendary. I feel as though 60 Minutes would have been a more credible platform to present this problem to the world instead of a Lifetime documentary. I’d like to hear R Kelly voice his defense for sure, but regardless his actions are sickening. We’ll see how it taints his legacy, it is 2019 so who knows.

2019 plans?

REGULATE

#Interview Mark Spratley AKA @SpratFool Is Proving You Don't Need Clout Tokens To Solidify A Musical Empire #Interview Mark Spratley AKA @SpratFool Is Proving You Don't Need Clout Tokens To Solidify A Musical Empire

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interview, Interviews, Main

#Interview Mark Spratley AKA @SpratFool Is Proving You Don’t Need Clout Tokens To Solidify A Musical Empire

Mark Spratley is a name in the industry you certainly should get acquainted with. A master of many, creating an…

Mark Spratley is a name in the industry you certainly should get acquainted with. A master of many, creating an entity in so many different lanes within the industry from management, PR, writing, events, curation and much more. Within five years of the industry, Sprat has accomplished what takes many 20-30 years. The young 27-year-old mogul is creating an empire before our eyes, and it only seems to be getting more and more impressive. Why wouldn’t it?! From helping to bring artists such as Lud Foe, DDG, DaBaby, Smooky Margielaa, Albee Al, Sicko Mobb, Nikko Lafre and many more to the limelight, his resume is vast.

Take a look at our most recent interview with the Starting Five CEO as we discuss music, how to get in the industry, his journey and much more.

Make sure to follow Sprat on Twitter and IG @SpratFool

You’ve been in the music industry for only five years and have already created something massive. How did you do it and what is planned for the future?

Countless hours, grind, plotting and studying. I’ve learned, and LVL’d UP. That’s it. I knew if I put in the work, I would find a way. I go 3000% for whatever I do or whoever I work with. Some people make the same moves and expect things to change. Some people aren’t willing to starve to binge forever. I’m out here mastering and succeeding at whatever I do. I make sure of it. I’ve got an insane ear for music, that’s been known. That’s why some of your favorite A&R’s would be asking me to pull up to their office on the regular.

I’m here to take over though. I’m going to continue to put people into position and maintain my brand. The empire is forming; the foundation has been laid and built.

We recently saw in another interview that you have a new platform on the way? What’re the details on that? (If you can give us any)

NEW DAY, NEW WAVE (LITERALLY). Zias (Popular youtube star &influencer) and I are partnering up on a new media outlet x platform for something special. We’re about to surpass the field quick. Two powerful influencers, we already got the traffic between both of us, both widely connected. Run it up!

Bunch of content on the way from both of us

If you could tell someone looking to get into the industry one piece of advice, what would it be?

GRIND SMART. Bring something to the table. Your passion and time can go a long way. Learn. Be willing to do what the next man is not.

Do you know how much free time and work I gave out to get to where I am now?! Now my time costs. Money isn’t everything, in the beginning, work for your opportunity. People worried about $20-$5000 (Short term money) when sometimes you just need to see the bigger picture.

You wouldn’t want everyone to bring ketchup to the BBQ; you need someone to bring the bun, the burger, the juice, the drink and everything else. Do you feel me?! Same goes for the industry or any job you do in life. Bring something different to the table and create a demand for it. That’s when you create stock for yourself (You create worth).

What were you doing before becoming a music mogul?

I was doing the school thing before I decided to leave for music full time. I was making money however I needed to.

What new artists do you have your eye on?

NEW SIGNINGS on the way. I’m getting back in my artist bag 3000%. Look out for all of that. I got to hold my list down for the time being.

How did you get into PR?

Fresh Moss and Neako had me on a lot of PR type of moves early. I always studied and noticed was going on in the game. Got tired of hitting up a lot of these foolish and corny “Bloggers” and people that were out and around at the time that felt entitled. A lot of them aren’t even around anymore haha. Many didn’t want to see someone else moving faster or making something out of all this. I decided to take everything into my own hands. From then on I turned this PR wave into something masterful. Countless artists have popped off since through my PR, their ability and me connecting these dots on the daily.

Top 5 modern artists most likely in your daily music mix?

It all depends on the day and mood

Lately… DaBaby, pre kai ro, Lil Baby, YNW Melly, Stunna 4 Vegas & DaiDough. I’ve been bumping FBG Duck heavily as of late; bro got energy.

A few artists are rising out of New Jersey that you’ve been alerting us about for over a year or 2. From Daidough to Coi Leray and many more. New Jersey has some talent for sure, how do you think your state will hold up in 2019?

New Jersey is UP right now, and it’s only going to get crazier. A lot of artists doing their thing. Daidough got home and been going stupid. Coi Leray has been spazzing since G.A.N.

Albee Al doing him as always, Tsu Surf home and just dropped a fire project, Arsonal on damn TV, Fatboy SSE is outta here and in his lane, Mir Fontane been putting in work. Jersey got a wide variety of sounds, every city/town is different, North and South Jersey completely different.

Beyond the artists, there are so many talented people coming up out of NJ and doing their thing in this music industry or elsewhere. It’s great to see people winning from your home state.

We remember you going crazy at SXSW with Smooky Margielaa a few years back when he was only an artist with a 10k following, how did you all meet?

Shit, my man Mike had told me I had to bump something while we were in LA. The track happened to be ‘Layed up,’ heard it and it was a wrap for me. His mans was GRAPE, we were all in LA, so we all linked up at the apartment, vibed and got to work immediately. Started putting in that push, went to SXSW and went full force after SXSW. Glad to see Smooky up right now.

We dove into your Twitter and did a little google search on you while doing some more research. We saw you got into it a little with Akademiks online last year? LOL, tell us more?

LMAO! If you did some research like you said I’m sure you know what was said. Jersey people certainly don’t tolerate bullshit. I called BS on something he spoke on. Jersey got behind it. That’s it.

What ever happened to Nikko Lafre?

Man, I can’t speak on another man that’s not with me. We had something crazy growing, that’s where I’m going to leave it.

Drew Love out here winning though with THEY, Lee Beats out here winning, Johnny Rain out here still doing his thing up.

#Interview Mark Spratley AKA @SpratFool Is Proving You Don't Need Clout Tokens To Solidify A Musical Empire

Thoughts on R Kelly latest situation and documentary?

SHEESH! I don’t want to believe it, but it’s their right before our eyes. It’s a shame because his music and voice are legendary. I feel as though 60 Minutes would have been a more credible platform to present this problem to the world instead of a Lifetime documentary. I’d like to hear R Kelly voice his defense for sure, but regardless his actions are sickening. We’ll see how it taints his legacy, it is 2019 so who knows.

2019 plans?

REGULATE

#Interview Mark Spratley AKA @SpratFool Is Proving You Don't Need Clout Tokens To Solidify A Musical Empire #Interview Mark Spratley AKA @SpratFool Is Proving You Don't Need Clout Tokens To Solidify A Musical Empire

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interview, Interviews

Madwiz Chats Career Goals & Creative Inspirations: ”One Of My Fave Rappers Is Kool Keith”

When artists say their inspirations include names like Eminem, Biggie, Tupac, or “all the greats,” but their music doesn’t represent…

When artists say their inspirations include names like Eminem, Biggie, Tupac, or “all the greats,” but their music doesn’t represent it at all, it simply comes off as pandering — to us anyways. It’s natural to be a fan of the greats, but we often find ourselves drawn to artists who not only like to explore a bevy of genres but timelessly seek out and draw inspiration from artists that other rappers may not. That’s one thing that drew us to Brooklyn MC Madwiz.

We’re admittedly late to the party, but his latest LP 718-MAD-WIZ is an absolute masterpiece that we’ve been bumping since discovery, and it’s not getting old. It’s this cool eclectic patchwork of samples and vibes; we decided to reach out and learn a little more about his sound — and career trajectory.

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“I’ll put it plain and simple for you: I want to be the greatest rapper that ever lived,” he tells AAHH bluntly. The self proclaimed “new sound of Brooklyn” hails the Ohio Players and his favorite band, and Prince as his favorite artist. His biggest inspiration (as far as career direction)? Marvin Gaye.

One time I got in trouble with my pops and he took away my ‘new music privileges’ and I had to start listening to hip hop from scratch,” he explained (low-key making his father sound like the coolest guy ever. “[I listened] from the beginning: Cold Crush, Egyptian Lover, Soul Sonic Force, Newcleus … ’Jam On It’ is still my shit. I had to study until I caught up!”

With such an eclectic array of sounds molding his own, the final layer can be attributed to one of Hip Hop’s most unique figures, the ”Ultramagnetic MC” himself, Kool Keith.

“One of my favorite rappers is Kool Keith. Whoever knows him recognizes he can say the most outlandish shit at times, but I’ll be damned if he ain’t telling the truth when he does,” he notes. “I took pages out of that book and added it to my style … and boom — Madwiz.

“It’s raunchy, it’s sexy, it’s poetic, it’s gangsta, it’s love.”

Having opened for names like Kendrick Lamar and A$AP Ferg, he has more than a few milestones under his belt, but says his biggest career moments are often the result of leveling up. “My biggest accomplishments are whenever I level up creatively… it shows in the reaction when I put shit out.”

This latest album, though, is something he considers to reside amongst his brightest accomplishments. “I evolved significantly from my last joint and the ones before it,” he says proudly. “I thought I was better than lots of these ”MCs” before, but once I saw that come together the way it did … I don’t even doubt. I’m humble though, I’ll talk more shit when I get through the door. Job not done [*Kobe voice.*]”

As he continues the rollout for the project, telling AAHH he has videos planned for every track (we’re looking forward to a visual for “2” featuring Radamiz, btw), Madwiz hopes this music will ultimately resonate amongst the majority of listeners.

“I want the world to agree on something for once … I’m making it so that one thing is the Madwiz discography and whatever it brings,”
he says. “I’m just creating as I go through shit, but above all, I want what everybody else wants. Peace of mind. Let’s find that.”

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#Interview: Kaash Paige Talks New Video “Love Songs”

“This song could potentially change my life,” she says.

18-year-old Texas singer Kaash Paige has been popping up on our feed — and playlists — as of late with her infectiously mellow vibes that we, quite frankly, can’t get enough of. After teasing a visual for her new single titled “Love Songs” for the last month or so, she finally releases it yesterday (February 14), with a trippy treatment sure to get you hooked.

“It’s about being infatuated with someone who wants nothing to do with you,” she tells AAHH of the single. “It’s like being stuck on stupid that four letter word, love. “I feel like the catchy hook caught everyone’s ears [thus far] and this song can potentially change my life.

“The visual is the icing on the cake; my friend Matthew and I directed it,” she continues. Basically, it’s me reminiscing on every little thing I used to do with my significant other.”

As Kaash explains, she doesn’t plan on slowing the momentum at all, and if you’re a fan of the vibe, she’s about to get even more mellow.

“I’ve gotten more into acoustics and neo-soul,” she notes, ”so keep rocking with me for the groove.”

Check out Kaash Paige’s “Love Songs,” below.

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