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Music Monday: Flying Lotus Releases New Deluxe Edition of ‘You’re Dead’

For his 32nd birthday this year, Flying Lotus decided to give his diehard fans a present in true Libra fashion….

For his 32nd birthday this year, Flying Lotus decided to give his diehard fans a present in true Libra fashion. On the one year anniversary of his fifth studio album, You’re Dead, FlyLo has released a deluxe 39-track edition of the album loaded with previously unreleased instrumentals.

The album includes instrumental versions of the original tracks of 2014’s You’re Dead, as well as brings the album into the world of digital distribution for the first time. Originally available as a vinyl box set, the deluxe edition features each track twice – once featuring guest vocals, once without.

The complexity of Flying Lotus’ production and his ability to take listeners to so many places with his experimentation is his strongest suit as a musician. The album could in many ways double as a film score and is most certainly Flying Lotus’ trippiest release to date. This album is not engineered for pre-party listening per se, but more so for intently listening while reading, drawing or drinking a coffee. It’s a lot to digest and the album’s content and direction is as mysterious as it is engaging.

The album flows between several styles of music, further proving that Flying Lotus is hard to pin down. It is as experimental as it is simple, as classical as it is modern and as jazzy as it is electronic. With bursts of sound, it almost feels like a mash-up album, with layers and layers of different instruments, transitioning from intense to delicate. There is some hip hop flavoring thrown in, with guests spots on vocals from Kendrick Lamar, Captain Murphy (FlyLo himself) and Snoop Dog, but overall this is definitely a collection of art that has its own place on the shelf genre-wise.

Theatrical in nature, the album’s theme is a journey through the afterlife through Flying Lotus’ interpretations and experiences. He doesn’t necessarily need words to tell this story and the power of his artistry is fully and humbly flexing here. While the madness of this theme is present throughout the entirety, its darkness is not depressing or distracting. Listeners don’t fully have time to invest emotionally in the deepness of the album’s themes because it’s as quick a listen as it is perplexing.

While this album may not be for everyone, it’s refreshing to enjoy the risks that Flying Lotus takes as a producer and appreciate his true artistry and committed desire to keep evolving and keep creating. 



You’re Dead
is available via Apple Music

My name is KC Orcutt, and I’ve now been writing for an Internet-specific audience for more than half my life. Growing up in Upstate NY, I recently relocated to Los Angeles, where I aim to expand my writing career, meet as many interesting people as possible and never forget that the beach is a 20 minute drive away. My work has appeared on a handful of publications, including Beatport News, 12ozProphet, Brooklyn Street Art, Music Times and Keep Albany Boring. I am an enthusiast of happy hour, getting out of the house, supporting my friends’ creative endeavors and listening to the same five songs a dozen times in a row - if they bang.
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There is a lot to unpack with this single. Top-level, there is this flagrant (metaphorical) slap across the head — as though he’s screaming, “I’m still here, stupid.” Below the surface, Cost takes the opportunity to reiterate his position, introduces rumor inducing storylines, and takes a look back at his past.

In the first verse, he drops mention of having traveled around the world on the dime of a figure whom he chooses to keep anonymous; as he explains, this person gave him the motivation he needed to jumpstart his career, but has since “turned faces.” It’s in this act — he further notes that haters induce the same phenomenon — that he seems to have found the strength to thrive.

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The second verse begins by reiterating where he’s come from — noting that section 8 and financial aid were his life preservers in his darkest moments. He also notes that he’s still in debt (half of which he paid off with the money he made selling weed). All this isn’t done to glorify anything, but rather serve as motivation. It also hammers home the fact that he has been there and done that, too.

Perhaps in a way, he’s exuding the same motivation that he felt traveling the world.

Playing chess as opposed to checkers is a line that poignantly pops out. “Memory Loss” is a strong (re)introduction or merely business as usual — depending on your knowledge of the band. Either way, it’s drenched in that endearing sense of honesty and realness that made them a group I’ve returned to numerous times since first being introduced to their music.

It’s all about the long game, and — in the end — good music. Cost notes that he’s motivated by things that money can’t buy. That, quite often, is code for having something to lose on a deeper level. It’s in seeing an artist stick to their figurative guns without bending their ethics that true inspiration can be felt.

If you haven’t explored the past releases, do so … immediately.

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D-Brown & 30 Boy Will Ooze Chemistry On “Full Court Pressure”

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The vibe is very familiar sonically. Hard beats that remain extremely cohesive, keeping the project fairly levelled — making for a skip-free top to bottom experience, without having to readjust yourself. The sub category the duo fall into often have a tendency to keep the thematic elements of their projects quite predictable. While these two do pick the low hanging fruit at a few points (for lack of a better analogy) there is this undeniable rawness in their bars … an almost explosion of authenticity that trumps much of the fabricated storytelling new jacks have made trendy.

It’s an aura reminiscent of Jeezy in his heyday.

At a solid seven songs (with very little fat to trim) the project is an easy listen — but offers a hearty meal for those craving some substance to go along with their playlist-ready bassy beats.

There are plenty of gems here. The aptly titled “Official” was one that I immediately found myself running back a few times — as I did with the look-at-me-now vibe of “Bag Today.” The obligatory but tastefully flipped song about the females, “Preferences,” sees the two professing their taste for women with money and things of their own (among other assets).

One of the shiniest moments on the project is the infectious “Memphis,” which sports a chorus from the LP’s sole feature — the older brother of Juicy J and the co-founder of Three 6 Mafia, Project Pat — helping segue the two incredible verses by D and 30.

The track has been my most played this week (it wasn’t even close).

Their chemistry is undeniable and their ear for the perfect production to complement their tales of perseverance, street life and subdued (but still prominent) themes of opulence are on full display. While the two can really rap, it doesn’t feel like past tense, but rather present tense play by plays.

“Money doesn’t make you real,” D laments in the intro of “Official.” It’s this mantra of keeping it 100 and letting it speak for itself that drives Full Court Pressure. Cue it up, press play and enjoy.

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